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For those who strive to be A Better Official

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working off season what to do what not to do

Off Season Work. What to Do. What NOT to Do.

You and I, like many others, will have opportunities to “do off-season ball.”  Unofficial scrimmages, camps, or non-school (AAU) tournaments and leagues all offer chances to gear up for the season to come, to get/stay in shape, to work with other partners and to “see plays”.

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Basketball Rules Fundamentals – NFHS

1.5 BASKETBALL RULES FUNDAMENTALS 1.5.1: Rules fundamentals are clearly outlined in descriptive material. When these are thoroughly understood, the chance of making an error in decision on some infrequent and uncommon situation is greatly reduced. All of the rules are based on these few fundamentals. Mastery of them enables the official to base the ruling on logic rather than on memory of the proper ruling for each of the hundreds of situations that may arise. The basketball fundamentals are:  While the ball remains live, a loose ball always remains in control of the team whose player last had control, unless it is a try or tap for goal.  Neither a team nor any player is ever in control during a dead ball or jump ball, or when the ball is in flight during a try or tap for goal.  A goal is made when a live ball enters the basket from above and remains in or passes through unless canceled by a throw-in violation or a player control foul.  The jump ball, the throw-in and the free throw are the only methods of getting a dead ball live.  Neither the dribble nor traveling rule operates during the jump ball, throw in or free throw.  It is not possible for a player to travel during a dribble.  The only infractions for which points are awarded are goaltending by the defense or basket interference at the opponent’s basket.  There are three types of violations, and each has its own penalty.  A ball in flight has the same relationship to frontcourt or backcourt, or inbounds or out of bounds, as when it last touched a person or the floor.  Personal fouls always involve illegal contact and occur during a live ball, except a common foul by or on an airborne shooter.  The penalty

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basketball referee learning points

5 Play Fridays – S1 E4 – Hey Ref! What are you even looking at?

5 Play Fridays – S1 E4 – Hey Ref! What are you even looking at? Today we’re going to look at plays going from Trail to Lead. Primary coverage. Primary defenders. secondary defenders. How we are going to officiate this game in two-person mechanics of course these principles also apply to three person mechanics Our emphasis today is understanding which players we are officiating, what our primary responsibilities are and staying connected to plays as Trail. Not giving up on them. Today as we do basketball referee play review, we’re going to focus on     Play 1 – Foul. Shooting Foul or not? – Basketball referee learning points Lead official is responsible for the secondary defender. he’s officiating this play for a possible block charge, for absence of verdict verticality, or for elbow contact here. the Trail official is responsible for the primary defender on the play. the primary defender is red 1 and needs to stay with the play and get this push by red 1 on our airborne shooter. we’re dividing the responsibilities of a who’s officiating what. Lead is responsible for secondary defender on a drive to the lane the Trail needs to stay connected on the primary defender and also ready to make any calls on obvious fouls in their secondary. so the primary focus of this play is staying connected as Trail but having discipline as a crew. recognizing who is officiating what.   Play 2 –  – Basketball referee learning points play down the lane secondary defender belongs to the Lead. Lead has first crack in their primary coverage area. Trail official has this player primary defender. we could from the Trail I have a reach-in by this player here but this block charge play belongs to the Lead. Play 3 – Lead’s call. Is shoulder turn by defender a factor? – Basketball referee learning points screening action player in the Trail’s primary Pass and crash play offensive

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- Basketball referee play review

5 Play Fridays – S1 E3 – 5 Plays to help basketball referees be a better official.

5 Play Fridays – S1 E3 –     welcome to another edition of 5 play Fridays where we look at plays and see what we can take from them so that we can get better as basketball officials. 5 play Fridays is weekly series with new videos releasing every Friday during the basketball season. make sure to hit subscribe and also the notification bell so you don’t miss out on any of our new videos. A quick thank you for those who bought us a cup of coffee this week. very generous and much appreciated. thank you. you can always buy us a coffee at abetterofficial.com/coffee   Today as we do basketball referee play review, we’re going to focus on    Play 1 – Foul. Shooting Foul or not? – Basketball referee play review now let’s look at plays the point of this play is to recognize whether or not we have a shooting foul if you are inclined to say this is not a shooting foul I encourage you to check the action on the play and get a clearer understanding of when the habitual throwing motion begins. basically the shooting motion by the player. this is a ball handler dribbler she is dribbling the ball she picks up the ball.  the foul has not yet occurred. the foul occurs with the hip check right here. that drives the player off their line. this is absolutely a shooting foul and the player should be awarded two free-throws. right here she’s a dribbler. she has begun her habitual throwing motion here. the foul occurs here when the player extends her hips. trail official. primary defender. open look. foul that’s a shooting foul two free-throws awarded.   Play 2 – Hard Foul – Basketball referee play review you alright new lead is

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- Basketball referee play review

5 Play Fridays – S1 E2 – 5 Plays to help basketball referees be a better official.

5 Play Fridays – S1 E2 – Today as we do basketball referee play review, we’re going to focus on two of the NFHS points of emphasis for 2018. we’ll start with two plays that involve traveling and then two plays that involve block/charge and guarding. Stick around for play number 5 as I guarantee it will be a challenge for you as a basketball official. let’s get started. As we recall from the points of emphasis video for 2018, NFHS says not that there’s TOO MUCH traveling being called not that there’s TOO LITTLE traveling being called but rather the accuracy of traveling calls needs improvement and the way to improve our accuracy is to first identify the pivot foot. Subscribe to our YouTube channel here. [bctt tweet=”NFHS says not that there’s TOO MUCH traveling being called not that there’s TOO LITTLE traveling being called but rather the accuracy of traveling calls needs improvement and the way to improve our accuracy is to first identify the pivot foot. ” username=”BetterOfficials”]   Play 1 – Step back move. Legal? – Basketball referee play review More basketball referee play review with this step-back play popularized by James Harden in the NBA among others. It is definitely being taught to kids today, so it’s something we have to learn to officiate. The player terminates his dribble with a right foot pivot foot. He uses the right foot to push his body away from the defender and creates space for an open shot. This is all well and good. The problem is he comes with a staggered landing landing: one foot two foot. By rule that is a traveling violation. What he’s trying to do is execute the move from our points of emphasis video. He jumps off one foot holding the ball but

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new backcourt rules for high school

New Basketball Backcourt Rule for High School 2018! Not so fast!

New Basketball Backcourt Rule for High School The National Federation of High Schools (NFHS) published new basketball backcourt rule exception. A shiny looking, ‘rules exception’ about backcourt violations, but in doing so they have confused many officials. Let’s get this ‘clarification’ about backcourt rules right. The language provided by NFHS: 9-9-1: A player shall not be the first to touch the ball after it has been in team control in the frontcourt, if he/she or a teammate last touched or was touched by the ball in the frontcourt before it went to the backcourt. EXCEPTION: Any player located in the backcourt may recover a ball deflected from the frontcourt by the defense. [bctt tweet=”9-9-1: A player shall not be the first to touch the ball after it has been in team control in the frontcourt, if he/she or a teammate last touched or was touched by the ball in the frontcourt before it went to the backcourt. EXCEPTION: Any player located in the backcourt may recover a ball deflected from the frontcourt by the defense.” username=”BetterOfficials”] Our video explaination: Our rules clarification for this year 2018 is about backcourt violations. It involves one single play that was improperly interpreted by the committee in 2007 as being a violation. We are going to look at that play. This play is now, by rule, LEGAL. So, the NFHS said, “You know what? We had this interpretation. It was wrong. We’re going to fix it by including an exception into the rule. Recognize that the backcourt RULES. HAVE. NOT. CHANGED! Here is our play… This is a legal play. Misguided Rules Interpretation from 2007 about basketball backcourt violation In 2007, NFHS said this play is illegal and this is a backcourt violation on red. When we look at backcourt plays, let’s go through

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