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League Season Intensity: Staying Connected with the Game #5playfriday

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Join us in this engaging episode of 5 Play Friday where expert Greg Austin breaks down complex basketball plays. Discover insights into correctable errors, flagrant fouls, and legal plays with detailed analysis. Perfect for referees and enthusiasts seeking to deepen their understanding of basketball rules. #BasketballOfficiating #RefereeTraining #5PlayFriday

⏱ // TIMESTAMPS ️
00:00 – Intro
We kick off the show with our signature intro, prepping for officiating discussions.

00:40 – Play 1️⃣ – “You Make the Call” Play: Legal or Illegal Dribbler Down

01:34 – Play 2️⃣ – The Dribbler Three Points Rule: Backcourt to Frontcourt Transition. ‍♂️

05:17 – ☕️ Special Thanks to Our Show Supporters: ☕️
Ted Haeder ☕️ Randy Wilson ☕️ James M ☕️ Warrior Savage ☕️ Chad Hartley ☕️

05:55 – Play 3️⃣ – Hard Foul in Transition: Assessing Flagrant vs. Common Foul
10:58 Submit Your Play!

11:17 – Play 4️⃣ – Correctable Error Scenario: The Challenge of Accurate Rulings ⏲️

19:19 – We have Correctable Error Training Available!

19:37 – Play 5️⃣ – Play Analysis: Determining the Severity of an Elbow Contact

24:13 – Review of Play 1️⃣ – “You Make the Call” Play: Legal or Illegal Dribbler Down

27:20 – Bonus – Analyzing a Defensive Kicking Violation on an Alternating Possession Throw-in

31:25 – ☕️ Special Thanks to Our Show Supporters: ☕️
Ted Haeder ☕️ Randy Wilson ☕️ James M ☕️ Warrior Savage ☕️ Chad Hartley ☕️

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Note: This video is archival in nature. Rules, interpretations, mechanics, philosophies and other information may or may not be correct for the current year.
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All right, across the country, officials are ready. It’s Friday night, we’ve got games in some parts of the country. It’s frigid in others, it’s rainy in others, it’s a rural environment. The officials are driving long distances to get to the games. In other urban environments, maybe they’re taking public transit to the game. Officials across the country are ready to officiate games on a Friday night. We’re here in the morning to get better as basketball officials, and we’re going to do that by looking at plays. Stick around, greetings everyone. Welcome back to Five Play Friday. My name is Greg Austin with A Better Official. We craft videos to help basketball officials get better and take control of their officiating career. We’re here to look at plays, to look at all the things as we like to say, and we’re going to get started today with a ‘You Make the Call’ play. What do you have on this play? Free void all over him, Croman, and boy is now it’s Stone inside, nowhere to go, skip pass over that should not be a backcourt as that ball was tipped. Oh, was it tipped? I didn’t see. I think they got that one wrong.

All right, a ball clearly tipped by the defense on this play. What do you have? Is this a backcourt violation? Put your ruling in the comments below and stick around to the end of the video, and we’ll talk about all of the things on play number one. Okay, moving on to play number two. During this game against Dakota Valley, good to see him out there. Winger with the rebound, shot is no good. All right, so we have a teammate of the thrower in a marked lane space, right? Who’s actually has their right foot outside of the lane space. This is a violation by a teammate of the thrower. The throw-in has ended when there is a violation by the thrower or a teammate of a thrower. The throw has ended. This should be a violation. It’s not a delayed violation situation, right? This preceding this, we had this player just subbed into the game. Their under their shirt was untucked. They had a moment where they were standing in this very spot. This is a great opportunity for officials to do preventative officiating. Hey, check your feet. I need you in your spot, etc., before we administer the throw-in. But in the absence of that, if we have a player who must have their feet inside of the marked lane space, a marked lane space, of course, is a 3-foot by 3-foot square, and they must have one of their feet on the front edge of the marked lane space. They can’t be at the very back and just basically get a running start. There are a number of restrictions for throwers. But let’s also look at the arm action by the player in the marked lane space for black where they’re extending an arm in front of their opponent. Isn’t this a violation of some sort or a foul or something? I have many officials tell me this is not legal. Of course, there is no restriction on this activity. They can contact their opponent in this situation. They may not illegally contact their opponent either preceding the throw, the free throw, or during the free throw or after the free throw. But the extension of an arm by white, the extension of an arm by dark blue or black, is not illegal. But our teammate of the thrower, it should be a violation on them. The free throw should have ended on this very simple play, but it’s always good to review these things. Sometimes our brain, we see a violation by a teammate of the thrower, and our first instinct is to extend and rule the delayed violation. But yeah, that’s a violation. The throw-in should end in that situation. Understanding free throw rules and restrictions, of course, is very important. Yes, of course, we have some training available at abetterofficial.com. Get better to help officials fully understand free throw rules and restrictions. And of course, we’re always at risk during free throw situations of checking out for just a moment. All right, that play reveals a player illegally being in the wrong part of the court, and that’s a violation by rule. And we would be remiss if we did not identify our tremendous show supporters today who help fuel our broadcast. Khamaali Rowan, Rod Helling, Sam Masiello, Patrick Keating, Stann Whipple, much appreciated, much love. If you want to help fuel the broadcast, there’s a link on the screen. It’s in the show description. It’s in the first pinned comment. Yeah, it’s up above. It’s up above. All right, we’re moving on. Let’s look at our very next play.

All right, let’s look at our next play. And out of bounds, I didn’t see that call. I didn’t see that either. Not sure what was called there. Interesting, either way, the ball goes back to the mill, as they say on their jerseys. That’s all you need to say, right? I like those jerseys, though. Nice.

All right, now Rule 9-3-3, it’s a new rule or a modification to an old rule. It’s now in effect in the National Federation of High School Basketball rules. This new change to the rule has caused many to be wildly confused about how to adjudicate plays. So here, we have the definitive play to help us understand Rule 9-3-3. A player may not, of their own volition, meaning voluntarily, choose to run off of the playing court, use the out-of-bounds area to get to another part of the playing court, and then be the first to touch the basketball. This is a violation by rule. This play properly shows how the violation has occurred. This play is properly ruled. But let’s go back, let’s go back in time. Last season, if this play had occurred, the moment where the player runs off of the playing court, this would be a violation by rule. This is the old rule where a player has voluntarily left the court. Last year, this was a violation. Now, this year, NFHS said, ‘You know what? That’s punitive. So let’s change the rule, allowing players to now run off of the playing court, and just add the one restriction that if they choose to voluntarily run out of bounds to use that part of the gymnasium to get to where they want to go, let’s just make the restriction that they can no longer be the first to touch the basketball upon returning to the court.’ Now, the problem here is that many officials have interpreted the language of a player who is out of bounds may not be the first to touch upon returning to the court. But this rule’s modification was only implemented for this very type of play, where a player chooses and voluntarily leaves the court. It’s not a player saving the basketball, a great save, and being the first to touch upon returning. It’s not a player going in for a layup and being out of bounds after the layup attempt, then returning to the court and being the first to touch. It’s voluntarily, of one’s own volition, choosing, ‘Hey, I need to get to the other side of the court. I’m just going to take the free access provided by the out-of-bounds area to do that.’ So understand that when adjudicating plays like this, the player must voluntarily, of their own volition, and that doesn’t include, ‘I’m going to go save that basketball.’ That’s not what this rule is about. It’s just changing what was previously a very harsh and punitive rule to one that only if a player does this action, then they are at risk of a violation, but only when they return to the court holding and are first to touch the basketball. Okay, it’s really important to understand where we started from in this ruling and where we are now. And the problem I see is that many officials are adjudicating these plays wrong, just taking the basic kernel of the language, ‘A player may not return to the court and be the first to touch.’ That’s not the purpose of the rule. The purpose of the rule is, ‘If a player chooses to leave the playing court, and not because of momentum, not because of saving the basketball, not shooting a layup, but chooses, ‘I’m on the court, I’m at this part of the court, I want to get to that part of the court. I’m just going to take the little sideways around the endline.’ Okay, so I hope that helps with that adjudication. We need to know, have a knowledge of the rules, we need to in all situations, throw-ins, free throws, jump balls, etc. Fortunately, at A Better Official, we have video training available. You can take advantage of that by visiting abetterofficial.com/getbetter. Check that out, maybe find something there of value. With that, though, let’s move on. Let’s look at our next play.

Driving up the court, trying to stop into Dobney drive. Big-time shot, tried to get it, attempt rebound there from

Lers. He’s in the air in a compromising spot, and they lose the ball. Trojans come away with it and get another… Oh, they don’t get the timeout, they got a jump ball, and it’s going to stay Trojan basketball. Coach Wilbur is incensed about a possible foul there.

As for anytime a player goes hard to the floor, we certainly want to know how did they get there, right? What caused that player to go to the floor? If we do that, we’re way ahead of the game. So, this rebounding situation, right, this is a three-official rebounding scenario. We’ve got three officials looking at this play. How does this player end up on the floor, and end up on the floor hard? Was it a situation of their own volition, bad luck, etc.? And also, it evidences a fact where sometimes the slightest touch, or for a player who’s in a vulnerable position, can cause that player to go down. I think we have illegal contact on this rebounding action by our opponent in white here, and it’s not a significant amount of contact, no foul is ruled there. We’ve got a player airborne, we got two players competing for the basketball, but if we note, black white 20 by just simply moving their arm backward, causes our other player to lose their balance, go hard to the floor. Ouch, that must hurt, don’t you think? He’s still down, did he hit his head? Oh hey, right, that was illegal contact in that situation. Of course, in rebounding situations, we love players competing, athletes being athletes, competitors showing their competitive fire, energy, want-to energy in the game. Rebounding action is super exciting and a part of the game, but we want to let it play out. But when we have illegal contact, which we do on this play, even though it is so modest, right, we need to get that in our game. Again, player drives, that’s verticality by our secondary defender 12, just the slightest pull down by white 20, who maybe inadvertently right, he wasn’t trying to pull the player down, he’s just reaching in the direction of the basketball. And then we’ve got some subsequent loose ball action, timeouts being requested by white, ultimately a held ball being ruled. So, rebounding action, we want to let it play out, but when we have illegal contact, we need to put a whistle on the play. Right, I would have expected a whistle on this play. Sometimes players go to the floor, we don’t know. Right, this is a play where we should know how that player got to the floor, whether it was due to them losing their balance, etc., or due to illegal contact. Hey, back at the start of the show, we had play number one, a ‘You Make the Call’ play. Let’s review play number one: free void, all over him, Croman and boy, now it’s Stone inside, nowhere to go, skip pass over, that should not be a backcourt as that ball was tipped. Oh, was it? I didn’t see. I think they got that one wrong.

All right, so on this play, we clearly have team control in the frontcourt, ball goes into the post, passed out to the top. Player on white deflects the basketball, and the officials rule a backcourt violation. Let’s look at all of the things. Of course, we know that the deflection by the defense does not cause a change in team control, and subsequently, our point guard here for blue contacts the basketball. They are the last to touch in the frontcourt, causing the ball to go into the backcourt, and the first to touch in the backcourt. This play is correctly ruled by our center official, who got a little ahead of the play here, right, a little out of position. But this play, let’s note where the player contacts the basketball, that is where the violation occurred, and that’s going to affect the resulting throw-in. We’re looking at a game that is in the final 30 seconds, it’s a one-possession game, we want to be super precise in those situations. But if we take a look at the play itself, team control on the court, right, that is not in question on this play.

Hold on, team control on the court. Ball is passed by blue, and the ball is contacted by white. 90% of coaches across America think, ‘Oh well, this changes everything,’ but this has absolutely no impact. Now, if this was the last touch on the court, and the ball went into the backcourt, then white would have been the last to touch in the frontcourt. But blue contacts the basketball last, and they are the last to touch in the frontcourt. This play is properly ruled, Our central official is in a great position. That is where the violation occurs, right? That’s important to recognize. Our violation here occurred here. A resulting throw-in should be at the 28-foot line here, right? And again, in an end-of-game situation, we want to be precise. There’s a natural tendency for the ball, you know, to be picked up by a player, etc., which in this spot on the floor would lead to an endline throw-in here. There is an impact on our decision about which of these two spots to use. I think it’s been statistically proven that a player, or a team, throwing in from this spot is more likely to score than a team throwing in from this spot. So, in an end-of-game situation, one-possession game, we need to be really good when it comes to that. A simple backcourt play, one that we want to get right in an end-of-game situation, we want to be really precise about where the resulting throw-in is, so that we do what’s right for the game. Okay, do we have time for a bonus play? Do we, really? Okay, let’s look at it.

Up time winding down, they’re going to get the ball up in time. Clark, for the win…

Yes, she does it time and time again, the 40 piece, and walks off with the applause.

Wow, Kaitlyn, what a dynamic player, right? So, the question raised: is this traveling on this play? No, no, it’s not. We have an end-of-game situation, final shot, tie score. You know, we can look at the position of our crew. We’re in fantastic position on this play. We’ve got possible screening action. Our Center is, you know, above the free-throw line extended. We’ve got six players. We’ve got a definite action area. If our lead’s looking off-ball, I mean, there’s nothing that’s not part of the game, right? The game is right here by the Hawkeye logo. We’re looking for screening action, legal, legal, legal establishment of a pivot foot. We’re giving a right-foot pivot in that situation. Is the ball put down before it’s released? Close enough. Is the step back off of one foot, land on two, close enough? Game-winner! I call this the Steph Curry effect, right? This, you know, 10 years ago, this would have been a completely exotic play. Caitlyn Clark is just such a dynamic player. These game-winners, the posture, the attitude, the vibe, it’s all pretty good. I know she gets herself into some predicaments with the waving off officials, but a game-winner, buzzer-beater, we love it. Let’s look at our Trail official, obviously a super accomplished D1 official, right? And just note, as Trail in the situation, stay with your shooter, right? We’re super excited to see whether the ball goes in, but we need to see, is there any contact by black 22 on the leg of the shooter? We stay with it. We are game over. I guess in this situation, they would probably have to stop for a moment and review NCAA Women’s whether it was released in time, but yeah, that’s how we like ending games. Super exciting walk-off, no con, no, uh, nothing on the officials in that situation, just a celebration of basketball. The better team wins, right? Walk off with a great play. Thank you for joining us today for Five Play Friday. If this is the video content that you find valuable, be a great chance to do all of the things. If you like this video, it helps us get it in front of more basketball officials and really helps us with the YouTube algorithm. Awesome. In addition, allow me to thank our tremendous show supporters who fuel our broadcast: ☕️ Khamaali Rowan ☕️ Rod Helling ☕️ Sam Masiello ☕️ Patrick Keating ☕️ Stann Whipple. Much appreciated, much love. If you want to help fuel the broadcast, you can do all the things. Yes, on the screen, in the show description, in the first pinned comment, and yet, no, I’m not going to do it. I’m not going to put it up above; you’re going to have to go find it yourself. All right, tremendous additional video content available for you here. Here’s the training available at our website. Check that out, and we’ll see you in the very next video. Take care, everybody.

League Season Intensity: Staying Connected with the Game #5playfriday

All right, across the country, officials are ready. It’s Friday night, we’ve got games in some parts of the country. It’s frigid in others, it’s rainy in others, it’s a rural environment. The officials are driving long distances to get to the games. In other urban environments, maybe they’re taking public transit to the game. Officials across the country are ready to officiate games on a Friday night. We’re here in the morning to get better as basketball officials, and we’re going to do that by looking at plays. Stick around, greetings everyone. Welcome back to Five Play Friday. My name is Greg Austin with A Better Official. We craft videos to help basketball officials get better and take control of their officiating career. We’re here to look at plays, to look at all the things as we like to say, and we’re going to get started today with a ‘You Make the Call’ play. What do you have on this play? Free void all over him, Croman, and boy is now it’s Stone inside, nowhere to go, skip pass over that should not be a backcourt as that ball was tipped. Oh, was it tipped? I didn’t see. I think they got that one wrong.

All right, a ball clearly tipped by the defense on this play. What do you have? Is this a backcourt violation? Put your ruling in the comments below and stick around to the end of the video, and we’ll talk about all of the things on play number one. Okay, moving on to play number two. During this game against Dakota Valley, good to see him out there. Winger with the rebound, shot is no good. All right, so we have a teammate of the thrower in a marked lane space, right? Who’s actually has their right foot outside of the lane space. This is a violation by a teammate of the thrower. The throw-in has ended when there is a violation by the thrower or a teammate of a thrower. The throw has ended. This should be a violation. It’s not a delayed violation situation, right? This preceding this, we had this player just subbed into the game. Their under their shirt was untucked. They had a moment where they were standing in this very spot. This is a great opportunity for officials to do preventative officiating. Hey, check your feet. I need you in your spot, etc., before we administer the throw-in. But in the absence of that, if we have a player who must have their feet inside of the marked lane space, a marked lane space, of course, is a 3-foot by 3-foot square, and they must have one of their feet on the front edge of the marked lane space. They can’t be at the very back and just basically get a running start. There are a number of restrictions for throwers. But let’s also look at the arm action by the player in the marked lane space for black where they’re extending an arm in front of their opponent. Isn’t this a violation of some sort or a foul or something? I have many officials tell me this is not legal. Of course, there is no restriction on this activity. They can contact their opponent in this situation. They may not illegally contact their opponent either preceding the throw, the free throw, or during the free throw or after the free throw. But the extension of an arm by white, the extension of an arm by dark blue or black, is not illegal. But our teammate of the thrower, it should be a violation on them. The free throw should have ended on this very simple play, but it’s always good to review these things. Sometimes our brain, we see a violation by a teammate of the thrower, and our first instinct is to extend and rule the delayed violation. But yeah, that’s a violation. The throw-in should end in that situation. Understanding free throw rules and restrictions, of course, is very important. Yes, of course, we have some training available at abetterofficial.com. Get better to help officials fully understand free throw rules and restrictions. And of course, we’re always at risk during free throw situations of checking out for just a moment. All right, that play reveals a player illegally being in the wrong part of the court, and that’s a violation by rule. And we would be remiss if we did not identify our tremendous show supporters today who help fuel our broadcast. Khamaali Rowan, Rod Helling, Sam Masiello, Patrick Keating, Stann Whipple, much appreciated, much love. If you want to help fuel the broadcast, there’s a link on the screen. It’s in the show description. It’s in the first pinned comment. Yeah, it’s up above. It’s up above. All right, we’re moving on. Let’s look at our very next play.

All right, let’s look at our next play. And out of bounds, I didn’t see that call. I didn’t see that either. Not sure what was called there. Interesting, either way, the ball goes back to the mill, as they say on their jerseys. That’s all you need to say, right? I like those jerseys, though. Nice.

All right, now Rule 9-3-3, it’s a new rule or a modification to an old rule. It’s now in effect in the National Federation of High School Basketball rules. This new change to the rule has caused many to be wildly confused about how to adjudicate plays. So here, we have the definitive play to help us understand Rule 9-3-3. A player may not, of their own volition, meaning voluntarily, choose to run off of the playing court, use the out-of-bounds area to get to another part of the playing court, and then be the first to touch the basketball. This is a violation by rule. This play properly shows how the violation has occurred. This play is properly ruled. But let’s go back, let’s go back in time. Last season, if this play had occurred, the moment where the player runs off of the playing court, this would be a violation by rule. This is the old rule where a player has voluntarily left the court. Last year, this was a violation. Now, this year, NFHS said, ‘You know what? That’s punitive. So let’s change the rule, allowing players to now run off of the playing court, and just add the one restriction that if they choose to voluntarily run out of bounds to use that part of the gymnasium to get to where they want to go, let’s just make the restriction that they can no longer be the first to touch the basketball upon returning to the court.’ Now, the problem here is that many officials have interpreted the language of a player who is out of bounds may not be the first to touch upon returning to the court. But this rule’s modification was only implemented for this very type of play, where a player chooses and voluntarily leaves the court. It’s not a player saving the basketball, a great save, and being the first to touch upon returning. It’s not a player going in for a layup and being out of bounds after the layup attempt, then returning to the court and being the first to touch. It’s voluntarily, of one’s own volition, choosing, ‘Hey, I need to get to the other side of the court. I’m just going to take the free access provided by the out-of-bounds area to do that.’ So understand that when adjudicating plays like this, the player must voluntarily, of their own volition, and that doesn’t include, ‘I’m going to go save that basketball.’ That’s not what this rule is about. It’s just changing what was previously a very harsh and punitive rule to one that only if a player does this action, then they are at risk of a violation, but only when they return to the court holding and are first to touch the basketball. Okay, it’s really important to understand where we started from in this ruling and where we are now. And the problem I see is that many officials are adjudicating these plays wrong, just taking the basic kernel of the language, ‘A player may not return to the court and be the first to touch.’ That’s not the purpose of the rule. The purpose of the rule is, ‘If a player chooses to leave the playing court, and not because of momentum, not because of saving the basketball, not shooting a layup, but chooses, ‘I’m on the court, I’m at this part of the court, I want to get to that part of the court. I’m just going to take the little sideways around the endline.’ Okay, so I hope that helps with that adjudication. We need to know, have a knowledge of the rules, we need to in all situations, throw-ins, free throws, jump balls, etc. Fortunately, at A Better Official, we have video training available. You can take advantage of that by visiting abetterofficial.com/getbetter. Check that out, maybe find something there of value. With that, though, let’s move on. Let’s look at our next play.

Driving up the court, trying to stop into Dobney drive. Big-time shot, tried to get it, attempt rebound there from

Lers. He’s in the air in a compromising spot, and they lose the ball. Trojans come away with it and get another… Oh, they don’t get the timeout, they got a jump ball, and it’s going to stay Trojan basketball. Coach Wilbur is incensed about a possible foul there.

As for anytime a player goes hard to the floor, we certainly want to know how did they get there, right? What caused that player to go to the floor? If we do that, we’re way ahead of the game. So, this rebounding situation, right, this is a three-official rebounding scenario. We’ve got three officials looking at this play. How does this player end up on the floor, and end up on the floor hard? Was it a situation of their own volition, bad luck, etc.? And also, it evidences a fact where sometimes the slightest touch, or for a player who’s in a vulnerable position, can cause that player to go down. I think we have illegal contact on this rebounding action by our opponent in white here, and it’s not a significant amount of contact, no foul is ruled there. We’ve got a player airborne, we got two players competing for the basketball, but if we note, black white 20 by just simply moving their arm backward, causes our other player to lose their balance, go hard to the floor. Ouch, that must hurt, don’t you think? He’s still down, did he hit his head? Oh hey, right, that was illegal contact in that situation. Of course, in rebounding situations, we love players competing, athletes being athletes, competitors showing their competitive fire, energy, want-to energy in the game. Rebounding action is super exciting and a part of the game, but we want to let it play out. But when we have illegal contact, which we do on this play, even though it is so modest, right, we need to get that in our game. Again, player drives, that’s verticality by our secondary defender 12, just the slightest pull down by white 20, who maybe inadvertently right, he wasn’t trying to pull the player down, he’s just reaching in the direction of the basketball. And then we’ve got some subsequent loose ball action, timeouts being requested by white, ultimately a held ball being ruled. So, rebounding action, we want to let it play out, but when we have illegal contact, we need to put a whistle on the play. Right, I would have expected a whistle on this play. Sometimes players go to the floor, we don’t know. Right, this is a play where we should know how that player got to the floor, whether it was due to them losing their balance, etc., or due to illegal contact. Hey, back at the start of the show, we had play number one, a ‘You Make the Call’ play. Let’s review play number one: free void, all over him, Croman and boy, now it’s Stone inside, nowhere to go, skip pass over, that should not be a backcourt as that ball was tipped. Oh, was it? I didn’t see. I think they got that one wrong.

All right, so on this play, we clearly have team control in the frontcourt, ball goes into the post, passed out to the top. Player on white deflects the basketball, and the officials rule a backcourt violation. Let’s look at all of the things. Of course, we know that the deflection by the defense does not cause a change in team control, and subsequently, our point guard here for blue contacts the basketball. They are the last to touch in the frontcourt, causing the ball to go into the backcourt, and the first to touch in the backcourt. This play is correctly ruled by our center official, who got a little ahead of the play here, right, a little out of position. But this play, let’s note where the player contacts the basketball, that is where the violation occurred, and that’s going to affect the resulting throw-in. We’re looking at a game that is in the final 30 seconds, it’s a one-possession game, we want to be super precise in those situations. But if we take a look at the play itself, team control on the court, right, that is not in question on this play.

Hold on, team control on the court. Ball is passed by blue, and the ball is contacted by white. 90% of coaches across America think, ‘Oh well, this changes everything,’ but this has absolutely no impact. Now, if this was the last touch on the court, and the ball went into the backcourt, then white would have been the last to touch in the frontcourt. But blue contacts the basketball last, and they are the last to touch in the frontcourt. This play is properly ruled, Our central official is in a great position. That is where the violation occurs, right? That’s important to recognize. Our violation here occurred here. A resulting throw-in should be at the 28-foot line here, right? And again, in an end-of-game situation, we want to be precise. There’s a natural tendency for the ball, you know, to be picked up by a player, etc., which in this spot on the floor would lead to an endline throw-in here. There is an impact on our decision about which of these two spots to use. I think it’s been statistically proven that a player, or a team, throwing in from this spot is more likely to score than a team throwing in from this spot. So, in an end-of-game situation, one-possession game, we need to be really good when it comes to that. A simple backcourt play, one that we want to get right in an end-of-game situation, we want to be really precise about where the resulting throw-in is, so that we do what’s right for the game. Okay, do we have time for a bonus play? Do we, really? Okay, let’s look at it.

Up time winding down, they’re going to get the ball up in time. Clark, for the win…

Yes, she does it time and time again, the 40 piece, and walks off with the applause.

Wow, Kaitlyn, what a dynamic player, right? So, the question raised: is this traveling on this play? No, no, it’s not. We have an end-of-game situation, final shot, tie score. You know, we can look at the position of our crew. We’re in fantastic position on this play. We’ve got possible screening action. Our Center is, you know, above the free-throw line extended. We’ve got six players. We’ve got a definite action area. If our lead’s looking off-ball, I mean, there’s nothing that’s not part of the game, right? The game is right here by the Hawkeye logo. We’re looking for screening action, legal, legal, legal establishment of a pivot foot. We’re giving a right-foot pivot in that situation. Is the ball put down before it’s released? Close enough. Is the step back off of one foot, land on two, close enough? Game-winner! I call this the Steph Curry effect, right? This, you know, 10 years ago, this would have been a completely exotic play. Caitlyn Clark is just such a dynamic player. These game-winners, the posture, the attitude, the vibe, it’s all pretty good. I know she gets herself into some predicaments with the waving off officials, but a game-winner, buzzer-beater, we love it. Let’s look at our Trail official, obviously a super accomplished D1 official, right? And just note, as Trail in the situation, stay with your shooter, right? We’re super excited to see whether the ball goes in, but we need to see, is there any contact by black 22 on the leg of the shooter? We stay with it. We are game over. I guess in this situation, they would probably have to stop for a moment and review NCAA Women’s whether it was released in time, but yeah, that’s how we like ending games. Super exciting walk-off, no con, no, uh, nothing on the officials in that situation, just a celebration of basketball. The better team wins, right? Walk off with a great play. Thank you for joining us today for Five Play Friday. If this is the video content that you find valuable, be a great chance to do all of the things. If you like this video, it helps us get it in front of more basketball officials and really helps us with the YouTube algorithm. Awesome. In addition, allow me to thank our tremendous show supporters who fuel our broadcast: ☕️ Khamaali Rowan ☕️ Rod Helling ☕️ Sam Masiello ☕️ Patrick Keating ☕️ Stann Whipple. Much appreciated, much love. If you want to help fuel the broadcast, you can do all the things. Yes, on the screen, in the show description, in the first pinned comment, and yet, no, I’m not going to do it. I’m not going to put it up above; you’re going to have to go find it yourself. All right, tremendous additional video content available for you here. Here’s the training available at our website. Check that out, and we’ll see you in the very next video. Take care, everybody.

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