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Officiating Insights: 5 Plays That Challenge Refs #5playfriday

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In this episode of “5 Play Friday,” join Greg Austin as we dive deep into five intriguing basketball plays, including a “You Make the Call” scenario, a discussion on the nuances of players leaving the court under NFHS rules, a double whistle analysis, jump ball restrictions, and a unique inbounding play. We dissect each play to enhance our understanding and officiating skills. Don’t miss our bonus play for a little fun!

⏱ // TIMESTAMPS ️
00:00 – Intro
We kick off the show with our signature intro, prepping for officiating discussions.

00:36 – Play 1️⃣ – YOU MAKE THE CALL
Block/Charge play from Center. What do you have on this one?.

01:40 – Play 2️⃣ – Violation Called on a player returning to the court! ‍♂️

05:33 – ☕️ Special Thanks to Our Show Supporters: ☕️
Samuel Schweighart ☕️ Marc Asmussen ☕️ Doug Mascho ☕️ Jesse Stricherz ☕️ Jack Nelson ☕️

06:07 – Play 3️⃣ – DOUBLE WHISTLE Breakdown – Confirm & Affirm the Call?

11:38 – Play 4️⃣ – JUMP BALL VIOLATION – Call Correct? ⏲️

15:15 – Play 5️⃣ – NEVER SEEN THIS BEFORE!! WHAT DO WE DO?

27:34 – Bonus – FREE THROW SITUATION – Can she go get it?

21:44 – Review of Play 1️⃣ – Block/Charge play. What do you have on this one?.

30:24 – ☕️ Special Thanks to Our Show Supporters: ☕️
Samuel Schweighart ☕️ Marc Asmussen ☕️ Doug Mascho ☕️ Jesse Stricherz ☕️ Jack Nelson ☕️

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Note: This video is archival in nature. Rules, interpretations, mechanics, philosophies and other information may or may not be correct for the current year.
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We’re back with five quick-hitter plays today. We’re not messing around. How many plays? Five plays. Stick around.

Greetings, everyone. Welcome back to Five Play Friday, where we analyze game videos to get better as basketball officials. My name is Greg Austin with A Better Official, and today we’re starting with, what are we starting with? What do we always start with? The “You Make the Call” play. What do you have on this one?

Alright, a charge is ruled by our center official on a secondary defender. Lots to look at on that play. What do you have? Is that call correct? Incorrect? Put your ruling down in the show comments, and stick around to the end of the video where we’ll look at all of the things on play number one.

Okay, let’s move quickly to play number two.

As you know, in the 2023-24 NFHS basketball rules, there is a clarification about players leaving the court. A player, in the past, could not leave the court voluntarily of their own volition, choosing to leave the confines of the court, run out of bounds, and then return to the court and be the first to touch the ball. In the past, just the act of leaving the court was a violation. Prior to the season, NFHS said, “That’s kind of dumb, no? What?” And I appreciate that fact. It’s only a violation if the player is the first to return and touch the basketball. Now, the problem that this has brought up is that many officials focus on the clause or the part of the rule, “may not return to the court and be the first to touch the basketball,” or “returning to the court and touching the basketball,” and not of their own volition. On this play, this player drove to the basket, and their momentum carried them out of bounds. They were out of bounds legally; they are legal. They can return to the court. They may not delay their return to the court and be deceitful about their delay, etc., like staying out of bounds, the play goes the other way, and then the team gets the rebound, and they step onto the court, right? Nothing like that, right? This is a legal play. This player has not violated. We can’t focus on the “first to return” or anything like that. This play was legal; this player was out of bounds legally. This is not a violation.

Of course, we have the player having the ball batted off their shin, right? But this is not a kicking violation. Something else on this play that was not an intentional act; it was simply batted off a shin. But ultimately, we have an incorrect ruling on this play. This player left the court legally; their momentum carried them off the court. They did not delay their return. Players in that situation will often wait a tick. They have to see what’s going on in the game, where they want to get to. There’s no responsibility that once you’ve left the court, you must scurry back quickly onto the court. There’s a natural flow and energy to the game, so we want to get those plays right. We don’t want to get hung up. Now, is this also a play that we could correct? If we were on the crew, could we correct our official’s erroneous ruling in this instance? Did their whistle cause the ball to become dead? Would we score the goal? Lots of stuff to think about on that play.

Hey, guess what? We’ve got a group of tremendous show supporters. I must take a moment, if you would allow me, to thank them properly. Who is up on the Show Supporter Big Board today? Samuel Schart, Mark Asmon, Doug Mashow, Jesse Stretchers, and Jack Nelson. Much appreciated, much love. You want to support the show? Yes, yes, yes, yes. Awesome.

Okay, let’s move on. Next play.

Blue 11, two-shot.

A good play to analyze. Two officials double whistle on the play. Who is officiating whom? Right? Understanding the system that we are working as a crew, who is officiating whom is step number one in the process. So, let’s take a look at this excellent example of a double whistle between a trail and a lead. First of all, do I love the lead’s position on this play? You know me, I do not. I do not like officiating from this position as lead, especially in a situation where we’ve got a limited amount of room to work. I would want to be wider on this play. First of all, but we have a double whistle, so who? Let’s take a look and see who is officiating whom on this play.

Alright, so we’ve got high screen action, a two-official play here

, with between Trail and Center. Our team, the defensive team, is in a zone defense, looks like a 2-3. Our lead is ball-watching, right? This is the first mistake. We need to find the next defender. Who is officiating this primary matchup? This is obviously the trail official’s play; it’s their play, 100%. Who is officiating whom? Trail is responsible for this defender; lead is responsible for this defender. If our lead was here, they would have a great look at this defender, right? That’s why we want to be in a great position. That camera person makes me very nervous, working as lead as well.

And then, who commits the foul here? The first foul is right here, right? Where we have this pushing action by the defender, and then we have 11 on the backside with a swipe down, right? Those are both, you know, both players have illegal contact. Which play happens first? And our officials confer. The confusing part about this is our lead official comes out with a foul on the primary defender on the play, the player from behind.

Okay, so this is a great play when we’re analyzing our game video to just show an understanding of the system that we’re working. This is an obvious foul. We are going to send this player to the line; there’s no question on that, right? But we want to work effectively as officials, as a crew. This is, as you know, you could break down plays from your own game video such as this and see, did you execute properly? Did you execute properly as the system defines it? Did you execute properly as you would want to on a play such as this? So, nothing controversial on this play, just a great example of how we want to communicate as officials. Right now, if you have, if you were lead and you had the foul on black 34, and the trail and I have the foul on black 11, I’m going to tell you I had black 11 from the outside, and you say, “I have 34 on the push first.” Perfect, perfect. That’s great. That’s great. Confirm and affirm who you have the foul on in a play in a situation such as this.

Yeah, yeah. So, a great play just to analyze all of the things, working on your crew dynamic, positioning on the court, who is officiating whom. It is so important that our system is designed for coverage based on an understanding of who is officiating whom. Yeah, awesome.

Hey, that video clip came in from Young Yip. If you have a video clip to submit to Five Play Friday, you know what? You could submit it. Here’s a link. I’ll put the link in the show description. I will put that link in the first pin comment, and I will put it, no, no, no, no, up above. Awesome. Let’s move on. Next play.

And here we go. Tip was won.

Okay, jump ball play. You know, jump balls don’t happen that often, and sometimes officials’ understanding of jump ball rules and restrictions are based more on common practice or myth than on rules. And we’re prone to putting a whistle on a play when we see something funny that occurs during a jump ball. So, is there any illegal activity during this jump ball? Are jumpers legal on this play? Yes. Are our non-jumpers legal on this play? That would be a question.

Now, we obviously have a player who leaves where they were when the ball went up and runs, anticipating where the ball is going to go. Is there any restriction on this play, on this player? That is the key question. Of course, on a play like this. So, who has restrictions on this play? Let’s talk about that.

Players, obviously, jumpers have restrictions. We know that they may not leave the circle; they may not touch the ball more than twice, etc. Who else would have restrictions on this play? These two players right here. They are on the circle. The 3-foot area around the circle is where players have restrictions. These players have restrictions. This player is not on the circle; there are no restrictions on this player’s activity. If they anticipate where the play is going and get to their first, that’s a legal play. Man, that is a legal play.

Wait a minute. So important to recognize. There are rules and restrictions when it comes to jump ball plays. Jump ball plays don’t happen very often. Give yourself a moment of processing time, right, before putting a whistle in the game that is not appropriate. Understand if you have rules; there are holes maybe in rules knowledge related to jump balls. It’s perfectly understandable, man. It’s perfectly understandable. They don’t happen often. A lot of times, we get passed down erroneous information, etc. So, yeah,

good play to look at, just refresh our understanding of jump ball rules and restrictions.

Now, of course, to start the game, is it a big deal? We made an erroneous ruling; nobody will remember that at the end of the game. But remember, we start jump ball, we start overtime with jump balls, and we don’t want to put an erroneous ruling in the game in that situation for sure.

Awesome. Alright, sometimes plays happen in our game where they’re really confounding. Let’s take a look at this play.

Ismail is the one to inbound now. Ismail is going to get it intended for Nave, but we’re going to have a talk. The refs are going to talk about it here. Refs here still talking. Ready for interruption from either team here, depending. And they’re going to talk here, and it’s going to be Ryers’ basketball. No, it’s going to be Arrows’ basketball.

Neither team here. Rough Riders do not agree with this one, but it’s going to be Olsen Thea to inbound.

Okay, alright. We’re giving the ball to a player on the end line. They quickly release the throw-in pass, and it hits our arm. The official’s arm bounces onto the opponent, grabs the ball, a whistle stops play. Our officials confer and try to get this play right. This is unfortunate. Obviously, we don’t, as officials, want to interfere with the game in this fashion. But the player went super quick before we could get out of the way. There are a couple of habits and fundamentals we could look at and make sure this doesn’t happen to us in our game. What exactly would the ruling be in this situation, and why? These are all good questions.

We have a long discussion. Our crew chief, it appears, who’s working as Center opposite, comes, makes an explanation to the offended coach, who’s going to come out on the short end of this, and explaining that, by rule, this is the correct ruling. Right? This is good communication. Is the coach happy about it? I don’t think it’s a situation where we have to bring both coaches together, etc. One coach is offended on the play; he will not understand the ruling on the play. There’s good communication. We’re going to resolve it, and we’re moving on. Coach, we’re moving on. Yes, I, you know, we recognize the situation that it is unfortunate, right? But this is how we’re going to proceed.

So, what is the status of an official when they are in this position? They are out of bounds. This official, when they hand the ball to the thrower, is out of bounds. When the ball hits him, the ball has contacted the floor, as similar to the floor, out of bounds. And then the ball comes onto the court and is first touched by the defense.

Let’s take a look at the habits and fundamentals. Everybody recognizes what has happened on the play, right? So, the problem here is that one of our players goes early. It looks as though the official may have sounded his whistle, which sometimes the players will respond to and can get us into trouble. I don’t see anything, you know, basically handing the ball to the Oppo, right, to the player. This is a common approach by an official across their body so they can raise their outside hand. Of course, NFHS count towards the player is the appropriate mechanic in this instance. Not everybody follows that, right?

So, I think, in the end, what we have here is a throw-in violation. Unfortunate, very unfortunate, where our thrower has caused the ball to contact out of bounds before the ball is passed onto the court. That would be the ruling. If this was an AP throw-in, the arrow would have been switched because the throw-in has ended. It’s not indicated clear that that’s the case, but this is what I would call a “funky play,” right? And one that we just want to get together. This is a competitive game. I think it’s a four-point game with four minutes to go, something along those lines. We need to get this play right, right? And a great job by our crew, conferring to get the ruling correct. It was a very lengthy conversation, but we come out with the correct ruling. It’s unfortunate, but by rule, this is what we were going to do. This is how we’re going to proceed. And when it comes to critical games at the end of the season, we have to have that mindset, not like, “Oops, our bad, let’s do a redo,” or whatever, you know? We have to execute stuff by rule. And I think our crew, on this very unusual play, gets it correct.

Hey, back at the start of the show, we had that play, you know, that one.

The center ruled a charge on play number one. Let’s take a look back in time at play number one.

Alright, a banger, right? So, the number one thing, first of all, this play needs a whistle. We have a player attempting to take a charge and is ruled to have taken a charge on this play by our center official. Not the center official’s primary responsibility on the play, but this play needs a whistle, right? We have to be willing to go out of our primary, give our partner a first chance on a play. When a play needs a whistle, it’s as simple as that. If this call came from the trail, that would be great as well, right? We would expect it from the lead. The lead did not have the defender on the play, so it’s a close play, right? Our defender establishes their position on the court very close to the time where our offensive player leaves the floor, right? And that’s our determination on this play, is, was the player airborne when the defender got to the spot, or was the player already in the, had not yet left the floor on this play?

So, if we take a look at all of the things, right? So, we’ve got high screening action here. Oh, that’s not working. Let’s go back. Right, looks like we’ve just had a rotation. We’ve got high screening action, double screen, lots for the center to be involved with. Doesn’t appear like they’re looking at the screening action, though. But now we get settled, right? Our lead official here is picking up this action, this competitive matchup, but they fail to transfer their eyes. They’re staying with the big and fail to transfer their eyes to our secondary defender. This, once this player starts to drive here, we have to find the player who’s going to cause us trouble, right? This is just basic, simple stuff that we want to do, and we want to execute. Really meat and potatoes stuff.

Our center official is responsible for, you know, is there contact here? Is there going to be a swipe down here? They’ve got a lot on their plate here. In the end, close. Banger, 50/50, etc. Center steps on the court, trying to improve their look. That play needs a whistle. That play needs a whistle. Put a whistle on the play with the information that you have on the play. I’ve given my lead first crack, no whistle. That play needs a whistle. From what I saw, from my information that I have, we’re going charge, right? We’re going the other way, right? Simple meat and potatoes stuff. Was the player actually legal? Let’s find out one more time.

Sold it to me. Sold it to me. Let’s see if we can find it here. This is, watch that right foot. Oh, that’s super close. That’s super close. I think our defender, feet were there, but their body was catching up with their feet. If this call had gone the other way, I could certainly see it. I could certainly see it. And then, this is going to be a play that we want to catalog as a crew in the game. Where are we in the game? We are 1 minute and 30 seconds into the game, right? So, this is defining how, you know, those bang-bang plays, we would expect if we had a similar play at the other end, it would go exactly the same way. Of course, we have a coach here on this play as well, with early antics, let’s say. Antics, did I say antics?

Alright, so let’s see. Alright, so a great banger play, right? That needed a whistle. We have to have a commitment to put whistles on plays that need it. Give the calling, the, the, the, what our system says, that is your play, partner. You do not have a whistle. I am going to put a whistle because that play needed a whistle, right? A banger play. And just be aware of the quality of the play, where it fits into our catalog of our understanding of calls we have made in the game.

Well, you know, we like to end episodes with a bonus play. And we like maybe a little bit of frivolity, a little fun, a little flavor. Nothing so serious. Let’s take a look at a bonus play.

The feeling of frustration. I will watch our lead when the player appeals. Can I go get that? Nope. Ah, right. So, this is the first of two free throws. Our player has the ball at their disposal. That’s key in this situation. The thrower has the ball at their disposal. They do some pre-shot activity, which free throwers do. And for some reason, they fumble the ball into the middle of the lane

. This is a case play, National Federation of High School. This is a violation on the throwing team when this happens.

It does bring about, like, what? What if, instead, you know, we did something creative? Uh, what happens if our defender says, “I got you,” and steps into the lane? Do we have a simultaneous violation? Violation, has the player violated before 10 seconds have expired, etc.? But there is a case play that says when this happens, obviously, the player steps into the lane, cementing the violation. But that moment of frustration where the ball is right there, but I can’t go get it, that’s fun. We like that.

So, an unusual play, one we have to be ready for. Many officials, in this instance, even at the high school level, in a nine-point game with four and a half minutes to go, we say, “Ah, just a do-over.” This is a violation by rule, and of course, we want to do things by rule, especially in key moments of key games.

Okay, fantastic. Here, thanks for sticking around to the end of the video today. A great favor would be if you would like the video. It helps us a lot with the YouTube algorithm, gets us in front of more basketball officials, so we can all get better together. Before we go, though, we are better for our group of tremendous show supporters who help fuel our broadcast. Who is up on the Show Supporter Big Board today? Samuel Schart, Mark Asmon, Doug Mashow, Jesse Stretchers, and Jack Nelson. Much appreciated, and much love. You want to be a show supporter? A link is here on the screen. It’s in the usual places, and it is up above.

Awesome. Additional video content is available, as well as a training opportunity over here. See you in the next video. Take care, everybody.

Officiating Insights: 5 Plays That Challenge Refs #5playfriday

We’re back with five quick-hitter plays today. We’re not messing around. How many plays? Five plays. Stick around.

Greetings, everyone. Welcome back to Five Play Friday, where we analyze game videos to get better as basketball officials. My name is Greg Austin with A Better Official, and today we’re starting with, what are we starting with? What do we always start with? The “You Make the Call” play. What do you have on this one?

Alright, a charge is ruled by our center official on a secondary defender. Lots to look at on that play. What do you have? Is that call correct? Incorrect? Put your ruling down in the show comments, and stick around to the end of the video where we’ll look at all of the things on play number one.

Okay, let’s move quickly to play number two.

As you know, in the 2023-24 NFHS basketball rules, there is a clarification about players leaving the court. A player, in the past, could not leave the court voluntarily of their own volition, choosing to leave the confines of the court, run out of bounds, and then return to the court and be the first to touch the ball. In the past, just the act of leaving the court was a violation. Prior to the season, NFHS said, “That’s kind of dumb, no? What?” And I appreciate that fact. It’s only a violation if the player is the first to return and touch the basketball. Now, the problem that this has brought up is that many officials focus on the clause or the part of the rule, “may not return to the court and be the first to touch the basketball,” or “returning to the court and touching the basketball,” and not of their own volition. On this play, this player drove to the basket, and their momentum carried them out of bounds. They were out of bounds legally; they are legal. They can return to the court. They may not delay their return to the court and be deceitful about their delay, etc., like staying out of bounds, the play goes the other way, and then the team gets the rebound, and they step onto the court, right? Nothing like that, right? This is a legal play. This player has not violated. We can’t focus on the “first to return” or anything like that. This play was legal; this player was out of bounds legally. This is not a violation.

Of course, we have the player having the ball batted off their shin, right? But this is not a kicking violation. Something else on this play that was not an intentional act; it was simply batted off a shin. But ultimately, we have an incorrect ruling on this play. This player left the court legally; their momentum carried them off the court. They did not delay their return. Players in that situation will often wait a tick. They have to see what’s going on in the game, where they want to get to. There’s no responsibility that once you’ve left the court, you must scurry back quickly onto the court. There’s a natural flow and energy to the game, so we want to get those plays right. We don’t want to get hung up. Now, is this also a play that we could correct? If we were on the crew, could we correct our official’s erroneous ruling in this instance? Did their whistle cause the ball to become dead? Would we score the goal? Lots of stuff to think about on that play.

Hey, guess what? We’ve got a group of tremendous show supporters. I must take a moment, if you would allow me, to thank them properly. Who is up on the Show Supporter Big Board today? Samuel Schart, Mark Asmon, Doug Mashow, Jesse Stretchers, and Jack Nelson. Much appreciated, much love. You want to support the show? Yes, yes, yes, yes. Awesome.

Okay, let’s move on. Next play.

Blue 11, two-shot.

A good play to analyze. Two officials double whistle on the play. Who is officiating whom? Right? Understanding the system that we are working as a crew, who is officiating whom is step number one in the process. So, let’s take a look at this excellent example of a double whistle between a trail and a lead. First of all, do I love the lead’s position on this play? You know me, I do not. I do not like officiating from this position as lead, especially in a situation where we’ve got a limited amount of room to work. I would want to be wider on this play. First of all, but we have a double whistle, so who? Let’s take a look and see who is officiating whom on this play.

Alright, so we’ve got high screen action, a two-official play here

, with between Trail and Center. Our team, the defensive team, is in a zone defense, looks like a 2-3. Our lead is ball-watching, right? This is the first mistake. We need to find the next defender. Who is officiating this primary matchup? This is obviously the trail official’s play; it’s their play, 100%. Who is officiating whom? Trail is responsible for this defender; lead is responsible for this defender. If our lead was here, they would have a great look at this defender, right? That’s why we want to be in a great position. That camera person makes me very nervous, working as lead as well.

And then, who commits the foul here? The first foul is right here, right? Where we have this pushing action by the defender, and then we have 11 on the backside with a swipe down, right? Those are both, you know, both players have illegal contact. Which play happens first? And our officials confer. The confusing part about this is our lead official comes out with a foul on the primary defender on the play, the player from behind.

Okay, so this is a great play when we’re analyzing our game video to just show an understanding of the system that we’re working. This is an obvious foul. We are going to send this player to the line; there’s no question on that, right? But we want to work effectively as officials, as a crew. This is, as you know, you could break down plays from your own game video such as this and see, did you execute properly? Did you execute properly as the system defines it? Did you execute properly as you would want to on a play such as this? So, nothing controversial on this play, just a great example of how we want to communicate as officials. Right now, if you have, if you were lead and you had the foul on black 34, and the trail and I have the foul on black 11, I’m going to tell you I had black 11 from the outside, and you say, “I have 34 on the push first.” Perfect, perfect. That’s great. That’s great. Confirm and affirm who you have the foul on in a play in a situation such as this.

Yeah, yeah. So, a great play just to analyze all of the things, working on your crew dynamic, positioning on the court, who is officiating whom. It is so important that our system is designed for coverage based on an understanding of who is officiating whom. Yeah, awesome.

Hey, that video clip came in from Young Yip. If you have a video clip to submit to Five Play Friday, you know what? You could submit it. Here’s a link. I’ll put the link in the show description. I will put that link in the first pin comment, and I will put it, no, no, no, no, up above. Awesome. Let’s move on. Next play.

And here we go. Tip was won.

Okay, jump ball play. You know, jump balls don’t happen that often, and sometimes officials’ understanding of jump ball rules and restrictions are based more on common practice or myth than on rules. And we’re prone to putting a whistle on a play when we see something funny that occurs during a jump ball. So, is there any illegal activity during this jump ball? Are jumpers legal on this play? Yes. Are our non-jumpers legal on this play? That would be a question.

Now, we obviously have a player who leaves where they were when the ball went up and runs, anticipating where the ball is going to go. Is there any restriction on this play, on this player? That is the key question. Of course, on a play like this. So, who has restrictions on this play? Let’s talk about that.

Players, obviously, jumpers have restrictions. We know that they may not leave the circle; they may not touch the ball more than twice, etc. Who else would have restrictions on this play? These two players right here. They are on the circle. The 3-foot area around the circle is where players have restrictions. These players have restrictions. This player is not on the circle; there are no restrictions on this player’s activity. If they anticipate where the play is going and get to their first, that’s a legal play. Man, that is a legal play.

Wait a minute. So important to recognize. There are rules and restrictions when it comes to jump ball plays. Jump ball plays don’t happen very often. Give yourself a moment of processing time, right, before putting a whistle in the game that is not appropriate. Understand if you have rules; there are holes maybe in rules knowledge related to jump balls. It’s perfectly understandable, man. It’s perfectly understandable. They don’t happen often. A lot of times, we get passed down erroneous information, etc. So, yeah,

good play to look at, just refresh our understanding of jump ball rules and restrictions.

Now, of course, to start the game, is it a big deal? We made an erroneous ruling; nobody will remember that at the end of the game. But remember, we start jump ball, we start overtime with jump balls, and we don’t want to put an erroneous ruling in the game in that situation for sure.

Awesome. Alright, sometimes plays happen in our game where they’re really confounding. Let’s take a look at this play.

Ismail is the one to inbound now. Ismail is going to get it intended for Nave, but we’re going to have a talk. The refs are going to talk about it here. Refs here still talking. Ready for interruption from either team here, depending. And they’re going to talk here, and it’s going to be Ryers’ basketball. No, it’s going to be Arrows’ basketball.

Neither team here. Rough Riders do not agree with this one, but it’s going to be Olsen Thea to inbound.

Okay, alright. We’re giving the ball to a player on the end line. They quickly release the throw-in pass, and it hits our arm. The official’s arm bounces onto the opponent, grabs the ball, a whistle stops play. Our officials confer and try to get this play right. This is unfortunate. Obviously, we don’t, as officials, want to interfere with the game in this fashion. But the player went super quick before we could get out of the way. There are a couple of habits and fundamentals we could look at and make sure this doesn’t happen to us in our game. What exactly would the ruling be in this situation, and why? These are all good questions.

We have a long discussion. Our crew chief, it appears, who’s working as Center opposite, comes, makes an explanation to the offended coach, who’s going to come out on the short end of this, and explaining that, by rule, this is the correct ruling. Right? This is good communication. Is the coach happy about it? I don’t think it’s a situation where we have to bring both coaches together, etc. One coach is offended on the play; he will not understand the ruling on the play. There’s good communication. We’re going to resolve it, and we’re moving on. Coach, we’re moving on. Yes, I, you know, we recognize the situation that it is unfortunate, right? But this is how we’re going to proceed.

So, what is the status of an official when they are in this position? They are out of bounds. This official, when they hand the ball to the thrower, is out of bounds. When the ball hits him, the ball has contacted the floor, as similar to the floor, out of bounds. And then the ball comes onto the court and is first touched by the defense.

Let’s take a look at the habits and fundamentals. Everybody recognizes what has happened on the play, right? So, the problem here is that one of our players goes early. It looks as though the official may have sounded his whistle, which sometimes the players will respond to and can get us into trouble. I don’t see anything, you know, basically handing the ball to the Oppo, right, to the player. This is a common approach by an official across their body so they can raise their outside hand. Of course, NFHS count towards the player is the appropriate mechanic in this instance. Not everybody follows that, right?

So, I think, in the end, what we have here is a throw-in violation. Unfortunate, very unfortunate, where our thrower has caused the ball to contact out of bounds before the ball is passed onto the court. That would be the ruling. If this was an AP throw-in, the arrow would have been switched because the throw-in has ended. It’s not indicated clear that that’s the case, but this is what I would call a “funky play,” right? And one that we just want to get together. This is a competitive game. I think it’s a four-point game with four minutes to go, something along those lines. We need to get this play right, right? And a great job by our crew, conferring to get the ruling correct. It was a very lengthy conversation, but we come out with the correct ruling. It’s unfortunate, but by rule, this is what we were going to do. This is how we’re going to proceed. And when it comes to critical games at the end of the season, we have to have that mindset, not like, “Oops, our bad, let’s do a redo,” or whatever, you know? We have to execute stuff by rule. And I think our crew, on this very unusual play, gets it correct.

Hey, back at the start of the show, we had that play, you know, that one.

The center ruled a charge on play number one. Let’s take a look back in time at play number one.

Alright, a banger, right? So, the number one thing, first of all, this play needs a whistle. We have a player attempting to take a charge and is ruled to have taken a charge on this play by our center official. Not the center official’s primary responsibility on the play, but this play needs a whistle, right? We have to be willing to go out of our primary, give our partner a first chance on a play. When a play needs a whistle, it’s as simple as that. If this call came from the trail, that would be great as well, right? We would expect it from the lead. The lead did not have the defender on the play, so it’s a close play, right? Our defender establishes their position on the court very close to the time where our offensive player leaves the floor, right? And that’s our determination on this play, is, was the player airborne when the defender got to the spot, or was the player already in the, had not yet left the floor on this play?

So, if we take a look at all of the things, right? So, we’ve got high screening action here. Oh, that’s not working. Let’s go back. Right, looks like we’ve just had a rotation. We’ve got high screening action, double screen, lots for the center to be involved with. Doesn’t appear like they’re looking at the screening action, though. But now we get settled, right? Our lead official here is picking up this action, this competitive matchup, but they fail to transfer their eyes. They’re staying with the big and fail to transfer their eyes to our secondary defender. This, once this player starts to drive here, we have to find the player who’s going to cause us trouble, right? This is just basic, simple stuff that we want to do, and we want to execute. Really meat and potatoes stuff.

Our center official is responsible for, you know, is there contact here? Is there going to be a swipe down here? They’ve got a lot on their plate here. In the end, close. Banger, 50/50, etc. Center steps on the court, trying to improve their look. That play needs a whistle. That play needs a whistle. Put a whistle on the play with the information that you have on the play. I’ve given my lead first crack, no whistle. That play needs a whistle. From what I saw, from my information that I have, we’re going charge, right? We’re going the other way, right? Simple meat and potatoes stuff. Was the player actually legal? Let’s find out one more time.

Sold it to me. Sold it to me. Let’s see if we can find it here. This is, watch that right foot. Oh, that’s super close. That’s super close. I think our defender, feet were there, but their body was catching up with their feet. If this call had gone the other way, I could certainly see it. I could certainly see it. And then, this is going to be a play that we want to catalog as a crew in the game. Where are we in the game? We are 1 minute and 30 seconds into the game, right? So, this is defining how, you know, those bang-bang plays, we would expect if we had a similar play at the other end, it would go exactly the same way. Of course, we have a coach here on this play as well, with early antics, let’s say. Antics, did I say antics?

Alright, so let’s see. Alright, so a great banger play, right? That needed a whistle. We have to have a commitment to put whistles on plays that need it. Give the calling, the, the, the, what our system says, that is your play, partner. You do not have a whistle. I am going to put a whistle because that play needed a whistle, right? A banger play. And just be aware of the quality of the play, where it fits into our catalog of our understanding of calls we have made in the game.

Well, you know, we like to end episodes with a bonus play. And we like maybe a little bit of frivolity, a little fun, a little flavor. Nothing so serious. Let’s take a look at a bonus play.

The feeling of frustration. I will watch our lead when the player appeals. Can I go get that? Nope. Ah, right. So, this is the first of two free throws. Our player has the ball at their disposal. That’s key in this situation. The thrower has the ball at their disposal. They do some pre-shot activity, which free throwers do. And for some reason, they fumble the ball into the middle of the lane

. This is a case play, National Federation of High School. This is a violation on the throwing team when this happens.

It does bring about, like, what? What if, instead, you know, we did something creative? Uh, what happens if our defender says, “I got you,” and steps into the lane? Do we have a simultaneous violation? Violation, has the player violated before 10 seconds have expired, etc.? But there is a case play that says when this happens, obviously, the player steps into the lane, cementing the violation. But that moment of frustration where the ball is right there, but I can’t go get it, that’s fun. We like that.

So, an unusual play, one we have to be ready for. Many officials, in this instance, even at the high school level, in a nine-point game with four and a half minutes to go, we say, “Ah, just a do-over.” This is a violation by rule, and of course, we want to do things by rule, especially in key moments of key games.

Okay, fantastic. Here, thanks for sticking around to the end of the video today. A great favor would be if you would like the video. It helps us a lot with the YouTube algorithm, gets us in front of more basketball officials, so we can all get better together. Before we go, though, we are better for our group of tremendous show supporters who help fuel our broadcast. Who is up on the Show Supporter Big Board today? Samuel Schart, Mark Asmon, Doug Mashow, Jesse Stretchers, and Jack Nelson. Much appreciated, and much love. You want to be a show supporter? A link is here on the screen. It’s in the usual places, and it is up above.

Awesome. Additional video content is available, as well as a training opportunity over here. See you in the next video. Take care, everybody.

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