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End-of-Game Plays WE MUST GET RIGHT! Looking at ALL.THE.THINGS!

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In this Five Play Friday episode, Greg Austin of A Better Official breaks down key basketball plays to enhance officiating skills. He covers a range of scenarios including deflected passes resulting in scores, handling dead ball situations with heightened awareness, and the criticality of making accurate calls in game-deciding moments. Emphasizing discipline, teamwork among officials, and the importance of correct rule application, Greg provides valuable insights for referees aiming to improve their game performance.

⏱ // TIMESTAMPS ️
00:00 – Intro
We kick off the show with our signature intro, prepping for officiating discussions.

00:32 – Play 1️⃣ – YOU MAKE THE CALL
Pass from beyond the arc deflected by the defense. Your Call??

01:30 – Play 2️⃣ – Dead Ball Activity. Did we catch it all?? ‍♂️

06:52 – ☕️ Special Thanks to Our Show Supporters: ☕️
Lyndon Goodly ☕️ Brian Schumacher ☕️ Reese Shay ☕️ Tami Cherolis ☕️ Jim O’shaughnessy ☕️

06:50 – Play 3️⃣ – Out of Primary call by Lead

11:27 – Play 4️⃣ – END-OF-GAME MISTAKE!. Can this be corrected? ⏲️

17:10 – Play 5️⃣ – OH NO! .1 on the clock, defense deflects the ball into the basket!

21:23 – Review of Play 1️⃣ – Pass from beyond the arc deflected by the defense. Your Call??

23:33 – Bonus – Welcome to Blargy Town — Population: 2

28:25 – ☕️ Special Thanks to Our Show Supporters: ☕️
Lyndon Goodly ☕️ Brian Schumacher ☕️ Reese Shay ☕️ Tami Cherolis ☕️ Jim O’shaughnessy ☕️

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Note: This video is archival in nature. Rules, interpretations, mechanics, philosophies and other information may or may not be correct for the current year.
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Back we are with Five Play Friday. Let’s do it. Stick around, greetings everyone, and welcome back. This Friday, we’re looking at plays, and we’re going to do it economically. We’re going to get started, of course. My name is Greg Austin with A Better Official. We look at plays to help us get better as basketball officials. The season is winding down, and we need to be great in our games. Let’s take a look at the plays, starting with play number one. You make the call. Play, what do you got on this?

One, alright. A player beyond the three-point line throws an obvious pass deflected by a defensive player within the three-point arc. It goes in the basket. Holy cow! How many points are we scoring, two or three? Put your ruling down in the comments below and stick around. At the end of the video, we’ll be looking at all the things on play number one. But let’s quickly move on to play number two.

Alright. Block charge play resulting in dead ball activity. Of course, when the ball is dead, it’s more than just a phrase. When the ball is dead, the officials must be alive. We must have a heightened awareness of what’s going on with the players, especially if we have a situation where the game has said, “Heads up” in every dead ball situation. Sometimes the game will come at us, and it’s like it’s chill, everybody’s cool, etc. But we want our habits and fundamentals to be built upon a framework of being very aware in dead ball situations. So, in this situation, we have a blocking foul ruled by our lead official. We have the blue player offering a token of their gratitude to the defender by handing them the basketball, and then the defender on the floor tossing the ball and hitting the player. Our trail official was engaged, recognized the thrown ball, but did not, I believe, recognize the previous action. And this is something now we have a dead ball situation, and our lead official says this is a situation we need to get together as a crew and discuss what we have. This is a very layered play scenario. Send the team to the benches again. Habits and fundamentals, this is a play we need to discuss to make the proper ruling. Let’s send the right. I like to encourage officials and crews whenever we have anything like this, let’s get practice at sending the teams to the benches so that we can discuss what we have on this play and then piece things together. Right? Maybe our center official comes in, they seem disengaged on the play and says, “I saw blue hand the ball, and before he threw it, etc.” And we could come up with double technicals in this situation. It’s certainly possible, right? But we need to put all of our information together, and different officials can have different pieces of the puzzle. Come together with a ruling, figure out what’s going to happen next. In this situation, obviously, blue five is to be awarded two merited free throws. They will do that with the lane cleared unless we rule a double technical foul, and then we would just resume the game at the point of interruption. The fact that we only have one official signaling a technical foul doesn’t mean if we came in with additional information, we could rule a double technical foul in this situation. So, takeaways in these situations, if we need to discuss, let’s send the team players to their benches. Now we have a clear opportunity to discuss freely and not worry about players in the game. Right? Get in the habit of doing that. Find opportunities to do that, so we get very comfortable with that process. Get together as a crew, determine your ruling, determine what’s going to happen next. If necessary, get the coaches together and explain the ruling. In this situation, I don’t think if we just went with the player technical, it would not require that. But let’s go to the table, report all fouls, make sure the scorer understands what we have. So, in this situation, we’ve got 16 team fouls for each. It appears a high school game to me, so it’s probably from a previous season. Not a factor in the equation, but some real positives here, and also a situation where we need to identify if we’re the center official in this situation, why did we miss this? Why did we miss blue handing the ball to white and then white throw? Why did we miss? Right? Because we’re not focused. We want to develop our habits and fundamentals, so when we make that move from center to new lead to administer the free throws, we’re not looking at the basketball or looking at the spot on the floor where we’re going to be. We’re observing players. We want to build that in, observing players into our habits and fundamentals, and that’s just going to, you know, in key moments

of key games, going to put us in the best position to be successful. Speaking of success, we’ve had tremendous success with the support we’ve received from our tremendous group of show supporters. Let’s see who’s up on the big board today. Lynon Goodley, Brian Schacher, Rees Shay, Tammy Sheris, and Jim O’Shaunessy, much appreciated, much love. You want to support the show? Yes, there’s a link on the screen, show description, first pinned comment, and up above. Moving on, let’s look at our next play.

Alright, let’s look at habits and fundamentals on this play. So, we’ve got lead, got screening action in their primary coverage area, and then quickly at the last minute turns their head, sees some event on the far side of the court in the center’s primary, puts a whistle on the play. Always, always, always, if we’re looking at only a brief glimpse of the play, we’re not going to be good. We’re just not going to be good. We have to recognize that in the game. Right? Something happened over there. I see a player on the floor. Right? But I have to trust that I do not have the complete picture on that play. My partner is in great position. There’s one defender on in this area. We don’t need to reach in that situation. We’ve got to show trust in the situation. Again, if we see an obvious foul, “I saw the whole play. That’s an obvious foul. I’m going, and that needs a whistle,” I’m going to come get it. That is not what happens on this play. Our screener is legal. We see a fraction of the play and a reaction whistle is put on the play. We want to show discipline, right, in our game, in these situations. So, our lead in this situation, let’s take a look. Maybe ball watching here, but they see this screen here that is in their primary coverage area, and they should stay with that. A late, just like, “I see a player on the floor. I heard a sound. Put a whistle.” That is just not the discipline we need to show in the game. The game doesn’t appreciate it. We have to show trust in our crew. Our center official, I wish we had the thought bubble. What’s going through their mind on this play? Um, what we, you know, clearly, we need to avoid reaction whistles when we don’t have the full picture. That’s where we’re going to be at our worst. If we, if we just put a whistle on a play, we don’t have the full view of the play, etc. So, discipline, discipline, discipline. This is late in the game, right? You should have worked out, you know, some, if this was the first call of the game, maybe you’re, you know, yeah, late in the game, yeah, yeah, yeah. So, a great opportunity just to review eye discipline, officiating the things we need to be officiating, that screening action in the lead’s primary coverage area. That was a really important thing to officiate. Recognize we just heard some explosion over on the other side of the court. We don’t have to have a reaction. Right? Show discipline in that situation. The game will appreciate it. Let’s look at our next play.

Alright, end of game situation. Team is down by three points. They have a frontcourt throw-in with 13.16 seconds remaining. Throw in. Something unusual happens. There’s a muffing of a pass. Ball goes in the backcourt, and it appears that a backcourt violation was ruled. In this situation, we cannot make mistakes as a crew. This is an end of game, game-deciding decision. If we make an erroneous ruling in this situation, red has no opportunity to rectify, to come back from that erroneous ruling. We cannot allow this to stand. The crew cannot allow this to stand. You have to fight for the proper ruling in this situation. So, sometimes, we make an error; one of our partners makes an erroneous ruling in a situation like this. We have to stop. Slow down, slow down, and come with information and get this play right. We have to. We owe it to the game. Yes, our partner has put a whistle on the play. We have to recognize this is not a backcourt violation by rule. The team throws, a confused player muffs the pass and deflects it. It goes into the backcourt, and then the throwing team picks up the basketball in the backcourt. That is not a backcourt violation. Right? Our other officials have nothing going on in their primary. They should not be confused and recognized while our partner made a ruling, but we can come with information, and we have to come with

information. Now, you are a young official. You are on a crew with veteran partners, and your veteran partner puts this ruling in the game. What are you going to do? What are you going to do? You have to fight for the game. The game needs to have this situation rectified. If so, we, if we have an inadvertent whistle and an erroneous ruling, we can rectify that situation. It would be a backcourt throw-in where white, where red picked up the basketball, and we would resume the game from there. The clock, any passage of time here, um, we know the clock runs from 15.9 down to 13.7. Yes, yes, yes. We come with information. We have to get these plays right. Now, as a young official, as well, one of the things you can provide to your crew is rules knowledge and the correct adjudication of play scenarios, right? It’s a way you can add value. If either of the other two officials in this situation came with knowledge and fixed this situation, they would have saved the crew in this situation. And we have to have that mindset. It’s not, we can’t just say, “Well, my partner made the call.” We can’t say that. Yes, he made the call. We must get this play right. We have to. Right? So, it’s a great situation to just recognize sometimes in the game, um, whistles go off. Oh, wait a minute. Done something wrong. Sometimes in the game, whistles go off. Our partner makes a ruling. We know that it is incorrect by rule. We have the opportunity to go provide information and not just provide information, fight for the correct ruling. No, we’re not moving on, partner. That is not a backcourt violation. We must give the ball to red in this situation and rule an inadvertent whistle. I know you made the call. We must give the ball to red. That is not a backcourt violation. We have to have that mindset. The game comes first. Yes, our partner made a call. We have to have the mindset that we must not provide a situation where a team is disadvantaged by an erroneous ruling, either in the first period or with 16 seconds remaining. That’s the other thing we have to have is get these plays right every time. Get reps in these situations, and then when it comes to an end-of-game situation, when all the pressure is on, “Hey, I’ve done this before. This is how we’re going to handle it.” So, a great play to see, a great scenario to think through, and how you would react. Are you going to step up and fight for the game? Okay. Habits and fundamentals at the end of the game, understanding that decisions we make as a crew at the end of the game are critical to the game, and we have to get those plays right. Alright, let’s move on and look at another play.

Alright, another game-deciding decision by our crew. We have to be prepared in end-of-game situations to get plays right, etc. It’s unusual. This a very unusual situation. Um, we have one-tenth of a second on the clock. White has a throw-in. Of course, as officials, we know that a player cannot catch and release a try with less than three. Only a tap would be allowed in this situation. The ball is thrown in. There is a deflection, and the ball goes through the basket before the lights show on the backboard. Is this the correct ruling in this scenario? And what are the habits and fundamentals of the crew? Let’s assume we’re coming out of a timeout here. We’ve talked about all of the things. That would be an assumption we would make. We’ve talked about all the things as a crew. We know that a player cannot catch and release a try, etc. We’re poised and ready. Maybe we’ve talked to our timer and said, “Hey, wait for my chop. Don’t start early, etc. Be disciplined, and what have you.” Right? Our ball is thrown and is tipped by an opponent. This is not a try for goal. We need to know when the ball becomes dead in this situation. We also have a situation where the clock does not start properly, and the reason it doesn’t start properly is that our trail official never chops. What complexity does that add to the play? So, by rule, this should be a dead ball, and the goal does not score. But our clock failed to start. That adds some complexity to the play. To me, the clock failed to start, even if the official failed to indicate that the clock should start, and this basket should not count. This is the incorrect ruling in this scenario. Even though the ball entered and passed through the basket, the clock did not start and should have started on the touch by blue

. Now, clearly, more than one-tenth of a second passed before the touch and the ball passing through the basket. So, the ball should have been dead. There should be no goal in this situation. If we look at habits and fundamentals, right, we need to be aware of what exactly has happened on this play. We need to be aware that the clock failed to start, um, and we need to look at our habits and fundamentals as a crew. So, a tough scenario because the clock didn’t start, um, but this goal should not stand. It’s as simple as that.

It’s as simple as that. Yeah. So, we have to be aware again of end-of-game situations, being our best at the end of games, preparing to be our best at the end of the games by developing habits and fundamentals along the way, so that in high-stress moments, we can make correct rulings in the game. Hey, back at the start of the video, we had play number one, that thrown ball from beyond the three-point line. Let’s take a look back in time at play number one. Well, that is a fine, how do you do? We’re 90 seconds into the game, and we have this obscure scenario that occurs. Can catch us off guard. It’s going to catch us off guard when this occurs, right? So, at other levels, this is definitely, without question, a two-point goal. But National Federation of High School says that and has produced case play and rule support for any thrown ball from beyond the three-point arc that enters the basket is to be considered a three-point goal by rule. As non-intuitive as that is, this is clearly not a try for goal. It is deflected and goes in the basket. Three-point goal by rule, NFHS basketball rules. It’s clear. What can you do? It’s nonintuitive. We need to be aware of these situations. Of course, this is, you know, in a, it’s two to nothing in the game. We’re just starting the game. This is not a game-deciding decision about whether this is a two or a three. But if this happened at the end of the game, in a key moment of the game, we would want to be able to get this play right. So, as non-intuitive as it is, National Federation, any thrown ball from beyond the three-point arc that enters the basket is to be considered a three-point goal by rule. There are some exceptions if it, if it’s deflected by a teammate within the arc, but in this situation, it’s still deflected by a defender, and a three-point goal is the ruling. Do we have time for a bonus play? I hope so. Yeah, yeah, we do.

Get into Anderson. He scores it. He’s got 22. Prince over to Witte. Wit’s going to be called for…

Actually, thought it was going to be a charge. Moulder got charged, called for the block. That’s his second. 87-66, two to go. H, he changed that to a charge. That goes on Witte.

Alright, welcome to Blar town, population two. Right? So, this is a great situation. Charges are great. So, we have one official who indicates player control. We have one official who is indicating a block. A crew comes together. They decide to go with a player control foul in this situation. Right? This is not uncommon. This is the way most officials handle these situations, even though by rule, NFHS says there is a way to handle this situation. Now, let’s take a look, and first of all, who amongst us has not been the lead here? We realized, “Oh, no. I have made a mistake.” I have made a mistake, and the body, the posture is like, “Oh, oh. What have I done?” Right? Let’s look at our game situation here. This game is decided. 20-point lead, two minutes remaining. This is a great opportunity again. One of the things we want to get as officials is reps. What’s the correct way to handle this by rule? What’s the correct way? Right? We may not know that, right. The correct way is, if we have different rulings by different officials, one player, one official has a block, one official has a charge, it’s not to get together and give it up to the primary official. That’s other levels do that. High School, clear-cut his situation should be to go to the point of interruption. We report both fouls. Point of interruption is white team control. Award white the ball on the end line at the spot nearest to where the double foul occurred. In this instance, that would be the correct ruling in this scenario. This is a great opportunity. Find opportunities in your game to do things correctly by rule, so that

when it happens, not in a 21-point game, when it happens in a two-point game, you can get plays right. Is it a moment of embarrassment? Great embarrassment. “Oh, we, you know, we screwed up as a crew.” It’s, “I’m, I’m, I’m covered with embarrassment. We can’t possibly do that.” It’s just business, man. It’s just business. Get the play right. Take advantage of opportunities to get plays right. And if you don’t know how to handle these situations by rule, don’t take the easy way out. Learn the correct way to do them by rule. Even if you don’t agree with it, learn the correct way to handle it. If you find opportunities in your game, do it correctly. Do it correctly. Do it correctly. Yeah, come on, man. So, we have a situation. Most crews in this situation, let’s avoid embarrassment. Let’s go. Let’s take the easy way out. “Let’s go with this. It’s your primary coverage area, and even though I ruled a block as lead, why don’t we just go with your call?” Right? But it’s a great opportunity. I encourage people to find opportunities in their game to do things that may be slightly uncomfortable if it permits, so that in key moments of key games, we can get those plays right. Hey, thanks for joining us today for Five Play Friday. Much appreciated. You know what I appreciate? I appreciate our tremendous show supporters. That’s what I appreciate. Who’s up on the show supporter big board? Lynen Goodley, Brian Schumacher, Rees Shay, Tammy Sheris, and Jim O’Shaunessy, much appreciated, much love. You want to support on the screen, show description, first pinned comment, and of course, always up above. Awesome. If you would do me a solid right now, hit the like button. It really helps us with the YouTube algorithm, gets the videos in front of more basketball officials. If you found value, come on, man, give me a like, and we have additional video content available for you. We have training available for you as well. Take advantage of those, and we’ll see you in the very next video. Take care, everybody.

End-of-Game Plays WE MUST GET RIGHT! Looking at ALL.THE.THINGS!

Back we are with Five Play Friday. Let’s do it. Stick around, greetings everyone, and welcome back. This Friday, we’re looking at plays, and we’re going to do it economically. We’re going to get started, of course. My name is Greg Austin with A Better Official. We look at plays to help us get better as basketball officials. The season is winding down, and we need to be great in our games. Let’s take a look at the plays, starting with play number one. You make the call. Play, what do you got on this?

One, alright. A player beyond the three-point line throws an obvious pass deflected by a defensive player within the three-point arc. It goes in the basket. Holy cow! How many points are we scoring, two or three? Put your ruling down in the comments below and stick around. At the end of the video, we’ll be looking at all the things on play number one. But let’s quickly move on to play number two.

Alright. Block charge play resulting in dead ball activity. Of course, when the ball is dead, it’s more than just a phrase. When the ball is dead, the officials must be alive. We must have a heightened awareness of what’s going on with the players, especially if we have a situation where the game has said, “Heads up” in every dead ball situation. Sometimes the game will come at us, and it’s like it’s chill, everybody’s cool, etc. But we want our habits and fundamentals to be built upon a framework of being very aware in dead ball situations. So, in this situation, we have a blocking foul ruled by our lead official. We have the blue player offering a token of their gratitude to the defender by handing them the basketball, and then the defender on the floor tossing the ball and hitting the player. Our trail official was engaged, recognized the thrown ball, but did not, I believe, recognize the previous action. And this is something now we have a dead ball situation, and our lead official says this is a situation we need to get together as a crew and discuss what we have. This is a very layered play scenario. Send the team to the benches again. Habits and fundamentals, this is a play we need to discuss to make the proper ruling. Let’s send the right. I like to encourage officials and crews whenever we have anything like this, let’s get practice at sending the teams to the benches so that we can discuss what we have on this play and then piece things together. Right? Maybe our center official comes in, they seem disengaged on the play and says, “I saw blue hand the ball, and before he threw it, etc.” And we could come up with double technicals in this situation. It’s certainly possible, right? But we need to put all of our information together, and different officials can have different pieces of the puzzle. Come together with a ruling, figure out what’s going to happen next. In this situation, obviously, blue five is to be awarded two merited free throws. They will do that with the lane cleared unless we rule a double technical foul, and then we would just resume the game at the point of interruption. The fact that we only have one official signaling a technical foul doesn’t mean if we came in with additional information, we could rule a double technical foul in this situation. So, takeaways in these situations, if we need to discuss, let’s send the team players to their benches. Now we have a clear opportunity to discuss freely and not worry about players in the game. Right? Get in the habit of doing that. Find opportunities to do that, so we get very comfortable with that process. Get together as a crew, determine your ruling, determine what’s going to happen next. If necessary, get the coaches together and explain the ruling. In this situation, I don’t think if we just went with the player technical, it would not require that. But let’s go to the table, report all fouls, make sure the scorer understands what we have. So, in this situation, we’ve got 16 team fouls for each. It appears a high school game to me, so it’s probably from a previous season. Not a factor in the equation, but some real positives here, and also a situation where we need to identify if we’re the center official in this situation, why did we miss this? Why did we miss blue handing the ball to white and then white throw? Why did we miss? Right? Because we’re not focused. We want to develop our habits and fundamentals, so when we make that move from center to new lead to administer the free throws, we’re not looking at the basketball or looking at the spot on the floor where we’re going to be. We’re observing players. We want to build that in, observing players into our habits and fundamentals, and that’s just going to, you know, in key moments

of key games, going to put us in the best position to be successful. Speaking of success, we’ve had tremendous success with the support we’ve received from our tremendous group of show supporters. Let’s see who’s up on the big board today. Lynon Goodley, Brian Schacher, Rees Shay, Tammy Sheris, and Jim O’Shaunessy, much appreciated, much love. You want to support the show? Yes, there’s a link on the screen, show description, first pinned comment, and up above. Moving on, let’s look at our next play.

Alright, let’s look at habits and fundamentals on this play. So, we’ve got lead, got screening action in their primary coverage area, and then quickly at the last minute turns their head, sees some event on the far side of the court in the center’s primary, puts a whistle on the play. Always, always, always, if we’re looking at only a brief glimpse of the play, we’re not going to be good. We’re just not going to be good. We have to recognize that in the game. Right? Something happened over there. I see a player on the floor. Right? But I have to trust that I do not have the complete picture on that play. My partner is in great position. There’s one defender on in this area. We don’t need to reach in that situation. We’ve got to show trust in the situation. Again, if we see an obvious foul, “I saw the whole play. That’s an obvious foul. I’m going, and that needs a whistle,” I’m going to come get it. That is not what happens on this play. Our screener is legal. We see a fraction of the play and a reaction whistle is put on the play. We want to show discipline, right, in our game, in these situations. So, our lead in this situation, let’s take a look. Maybe ball watching here, but they see this screen here that is in their primary coverage area, and they should stay with that. A late, just like, “I see a player on the floor. I heard a sound. Put a whistle.” That is just not the discipline we need to show in the game. The game doesn’t appreciate it. We have to show trust in our crew. Our center official, I wish we had the thought bubble. What’s going through their mind on this play? Um, what we, you know, clearly, we need to avoid reaction whistles when we don’t have the full picture. That’s where we’re going to be at our worst. If we, if we just put a whistle on a play, we don’t have the full view of the play, etc. So, discipline, discipline, discipline. This is late in the game, right? You should have worked out, you know, some, if this was the first call of the game, maybe you’re, you know, yeah, late in the game, yeah, yeah, yeah. So, a great opportunity just to review eye discipline, officiating the things we need to be officiating, that screening action in the lead’s primary coverage area. That was a really important thing to officiate. Recognize we just heard some explosion over on the other side of the court. We don’t have to have a reaction. Right? Show discipline in that situation. The game will appreciate it. Let’s look at our next play.

Alright, end of game situation. Team is down by three points. They have a frontcourt throw-in with 13.16 seconds remaining. Throw in. Something unusual happens. There’s a muffing of a pass. Ball goes in the backcourt, and it appears that a backcourt violation was ruled. In this situation, we cannot make mistakes as a crew. This is an end of game, game-deciding decision. If we make an erroneous ruling in this situation, red has no opportunity to rectify, to come back from that erroneous ruling. We cannot allow this to stand. The crew cannot allow this to stand. You have to fight for the proper ruling in this situation. So, sometimes, we make an error; one of our partners makes an erroneous ruling in a situation like this. We have to stop. Slow down, slow down, and come with information and get this play right. We have to. We owe it to the game. Yes, our partner has put a whistle on the play. We have to recognize this is not a backcourt violation by rule. The team throws, a confused player muffs the pass and deflects it. It goes into the backcourt, and then the throwing team picks up the basketball in the backcourt. That is not a backcourt violation. Right? Our other officials have nothing going on in their primary. They should not be confused and recognized while our partner made a ruling, but we can come with information, and we have to come with

information. Now, you are a young official. You are on a crew with veteran partners, and your veteran partner puts this ruling in the game. What are you going to do? What are you going to do? You have to fight for the game. The game needs to have this situation rectified. If so, we, if we have an inadvertent whistle and an erroneous ruling, we can rectify that situation. It would be a backcourt throw-in where white, where red picked up the basketball, and we would resume the game from there. The clock, any passage of time here, um, we know the clock runs from 15.9 down to 13.7. Yes, yes, yes. We come with information. We have to get these plays right. Now, as a young official, as well, one of the things you can provide to your crew is rules knowledge and the correct adjudication of play scenarios, right? It’s a way you can add value. If either of the other two officials in this situation came with knowledge and fixed this situation, they would have saved the crew in this situation. And we have to have that mindset. It’s not, we can’t just say, “Well, my partner made the call.” We can’t say that. Yes, he made the call. We must get this play right. We have to. Right? So, it’s a great situation to just recognize sometimes in the game, um, whistles go off. Oh, wait a minute. Done something wrong. Sometimes in the game, whistles go off. Our partner makes a ruling. We know that it is incorrect by rule. We have the opportunity to go provide information and not just provide information, fight for the correct ruling. No, we’re not moving on, partner. That is not a backcourt violation. We must give the ball to red in this situation and rule an inadvertent whistle. I know you made the call. We must give the ball to red. That is not a backcourt violation. We have to have that mindset. The game comes first. Yes, our partner made a call. We have to have the mindset that we must not provide a situation where a team is disadvantaged by an erroneous ruling, either in the first period or with 16 seconds remaining. That’s the other thing we have to have is get these plays right every time. Get reps in these situations, and then when it comes to an end-of-game situation, when all the pressure is on, “Hey, I’ve done this before. This is how we’re going to handle it.” So, a great play to see, a great scenario to think through, and how you would react. Are you going to step up and fight for the game? Okay. Habits and fundamentals at the end of the game, understanding that decisions we make as a crew at the end of the game are critical to the game, and we have to get those plays right. Alright, let’s move on and look at another play.

Alright, another game-deciding decision by our crew. We have to be prepared in end-of-game situations to get plays right, etc. It’s unusual. This a very unusual situation. Um, we have one-tenth of a second on the clock. White has a throw-in. Of course, as officials, we know that a player cannot catch and release a try with less than three. Only a tap would be allowed in this situation. The ball is thrown in. There is a deflection, and the ball goes through the basket before the lights show on the backboard. Is this the correct ruling in this scenario? And what are the habits and fundamentals of the crew? Let’s assume we’re coming out of a timeout here. We’ve talked about all of the things. That would be an assumption we would make. We’ve talked about all the things as a crew. We know that a player cannot catch and release a try, etc. We’re poised and ready. Maybe we’ve talked to our timer and said, “Hey, wait for my chop. Don’t start early, etc. Be disciplined, and what have you.” Right? Our ball is thrown and is tipped by an opponent. This is not a try for goal. We need to know when the ball becomes dead in this situation. We also have a situation where the clock does not start properly, and the reason it doesn’t start properly is that our trail official never chops. What complexity does that add to the play? So, by rule, this should be a dead ball, and the goal does not score. But our clock failed to start. That adds some complexity to the play. To me, the clock failed to start, even if the official failed to indicate that the clock should start, and this basket should not count. This is the incorrect ruling in this scenario. Even though the ball entered and passed through the basket, the clock did not start and should have started on the touch by blue

. Now, clearly, more than one-tenth of a second passed before the touch and the ball passing through the basket. So, the ball should have been dead. There should be no goal in this situation. If we look at habits and fundamentals, right, we need to be aware of what exactly has happened on this play. We need to be aware that the clock failed to start, um, and we need to look at our habits and fundamentals as a crew. So, a tough scenario because the clock didn’t start, um, but this goal should not stand. It’s as simple as that.

It’s as simple as that. Yeah. So, we have to be aware again of end-of-game situations, being our best at the end of games, preparing to be our best at the end of the games by developing habits and fundamentals along the way, so that in high-stress moments, we can make correct rulings in the game. Hey, back at the start of the video, we had play number one, that thrown ball from beyond the three-point line. Let’s take a look back in time at play number one. Well, that is a fine, how do you do? We’re 90 seconds into the game, and we have this obscure scenario that occurs. Can catch us off guard. It’s going to catch us off guard when this occurs, right? So, at other levels, this is definitely, without question, a two-point goal. But National Federation of High School says that and has produced case play and rule support for any thrown ball from beyond the three-point arc that enters the basket is to be considered a three-point goal by rule. As non-intuitive as that is, this is clearly not a try for goal. It is deflected and goes in the basket. Three-point goal by rule, NFHS basketball rules. It’s clear. What can you do? It’s nonintuitive. We need to be aware of these situations. Of course, this is, you know, in a, it’s two to nothing in the game. We’re just starting the game. This is not a game-deciding decision about whether this is a two or a three. But if this happened at the end of the game, in a key moment of the game, we would want to be able to get this play right. So, as non-intuitive as it is, National Federation, any thrown ball from beyond the three-point arc that enters the basket is to be considered a three-point goal by rule. There are some exceptions if it, if it’s deflected by a teammate within the arc, but in this situation, it’s still deflected by a defender, and a three-point goal is the ruling. Do we have time for a bonus play? I hope so. Yeah, yeah, we do.

Get into Anderson. He scores it. He’s got 22. Prince over to Witte. Wit’s going to be called for…

Actually, thought it was going to be a charge. Moulder got charged, called for the block. That’s his second. 87-66, two to go. H, he changed that to a charge. That goes on Witte.

Alright, welcome to Blar town, population two. Right? So, this is a great situation. Charges are great. So, we have one official who indicates player control. We have one official who is indicating a block. A crew comes together. They decide to go with a player control foul in this situation. Right? This is not uncommon. This is the way most officials handle these situations, even though by rule, NFHS says there is a way to handle this situation. Now, let’s take a look, and first of all, who amongst us has not been the lead here? We realized, “Oh, no. I have made a mistake.” I have made a mistake, and the body, the posture is like, “Oh, oh. What have I done?” Right? Let’s look at our game situation here. This game is decided. 20-point lead, two minutes remaining. This is a great opportunity again. One of the things we want to get as officials is reps. What’s the correct way to handle this by rule? What’s the correct way? Right? We may not know that, right. The correct way is, if we have different rulings by different officials, one player, one official has a block, one official has a charge, it’s not to get together and give it up to the primary official. That’s other levels do that. High School, clear-cut his situation should be to go to the point of interruption. We report both fouls. Point of interruption is white team control. Award white the ball on the end line at the spot nearest to where the double foul occurred. In this instance, that would be the correct ruling in this scenario. This is a great opportunity. Find opportunities in your game to do things correctly by rule, so that

when it happens, not in a 21-point game, when it happens in a two-point game, you can get plays right. Is it a moment of embarrassment? Great embarrassment. “Oh, we, you know, we screwed up as a crew.” It’s, “I’m, I’m, I’m covered with embarrassment. We can’t possibly do that.” It’s just business, man. It’s just business. Get the play right. Take advantage of opportunities to get plays right. And if you don’t know how to handle these situations by rule, don’t take the easy way out. Learn the correct way to do them by rule. Even if you don’t agree with it, learn the correct way to handle it. If you find opportunities in your game, do it correctly. Do it correctly. Do it correctly. Yeah, come on, man. So, we have a situation. Most crews in this situation, let’s avoid embarrassment. Let’s go. Let’s take the easy way out. “Let’s go with this. It’s your primary coverage area, and even though I ruled a block as lead, why don’t we just go with your call?” Right? But it’s a great opportunity. I encourage people to find opportunities in their game to do things that may be slightly uncomfortable if it permits, so that in key moments of key games, we can get those plays right. Hey, thanks for joining us today for Five Play Friday. Much appreciated. You know what I appreciate? I appreciate our tremendous show supporters. That’s what I appreciate. Who’s up on the show supporter big board? Lynen Goodley, Brian Schumacher, Rees Shay, Tammy Sheris, and Jim O’Shaunessy, much appreciated, much love. You want to support on the screen, show description, first pinned comment, and of course, always up above. Awesome. If you would do me a solid right now, hit the like button. It really helps us with the YouTube algorithm, gets the videos in front of more basketball officials. If you found value, come on, man, give me a like, and we have additional video content available for you. We have training available for you as well. Take advantage of those, and we’ll see you in the very next video. Take care, everybody.

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