Basketball Rules Expert Podcast – Ep. 4 – A Better Official

Show Notes

Basketball Rules Expert Podcast takes the rules off the printed page, breathes life into them, so officials can have them on the court where it’s most important.

Twice weekly episodes focused on NFHS National Federation of High Schools Basketball Rules.
We take the rules off of the printed page, breath life into them, and give them to officials so they can take them with them onto the court where it it most important.


Special thanks to:
Hair & Makeup: Rosie
Photography Best Boy: Grace
Sound Tech: Gus

Theme music: Parasail/ Silent Partner

Show Transcript

Episode 4 – Dominate Throw-Ins in High School Basketball

Greetings everyone we are back in the studio with another episode of the Basketball Rules Expert. The show where we elevate the rules off of the written page. We breathe life into them — clarify, simplify, and present them to you in an audio visual format so that you can take the rules with you onto the basketball court. We exclusively discuss National Federation of High School Basketball Rules. Before we get started in the episode today a special thanks to Donald Griffin and Isaac Rugali for their generous support of the show you can always buy us a coffee at abetterofficial.com/coffee.

Before we get started in the episode today a special thanks to Donald Griffin and Isaac Rugali for their generous support of the show you can always buy us a coffee at abetterofficial.com/coffee.

If you have any comments or feedback on the episode, ask questions in the comments below, or you can email us at bre@abetterofficial.com. Let’s get started with today’s episode. In our last episode of the show we discussed throw in restriction. We had a general outline on throw-in restrictions, the throw-in restrictions on the thrower, the restrictions on the teammate of the thrower and the restrictions on the defenders on the court.

Today, we’re going to clarify and talk about all of the restrictions on the defensive players. We’re going to talk about a throw in where the team can move along the end line, and we’ll discuss considerations for alternating-possession throw ins. This will complete our complete overview of the throw in national Federation of high school basketball.

Let’s Get Started

When we talked last week about restrictions on the thrower, we were referring exclusively to 9-2-10, which States that a defensive player may not extend any part of their body through the boundary plane. They cannot reach across the boundary plane with their arms, hands or their feet. This is still the case, but what we didn’t talk about is there is no such restriction on the thrower. The thrower is allowed to extend the ball through the boundary plane, have their arms and the ball extended onto the court.

What then are the restrictions on the defensive player? Obviously the ball is on this side of the boundary plane for them. We will talk about that. But first of all, a defensive player during a throw in is not allowed to extend any part of their body through the boundary plane. If they do, the penalty is a delay of game warning to the team. So the opponent of the thrower extends through the boundary plane. The official blows their whistle and issues a delay of game warning to the team goes through the proper procedure of notifying the, the head coach notifying the book of the warning, but a warning is the penalty for reaching a hand through the plane. If the team has already received a delay of game warning for any of the items that a warning can be issued for the result is a team technical foul for incurring this violation after a warning had been given. So the result would be a team technical would be two free throws for the offended team and the ball at the division line, opposite the table. Simple, straightforward.

Now let’s say our defensive player extends a hand through the boundary plane and touches or dislodges the basketball. Now we have a technical foul for a player reaching through the boundary plane and contacting the basketball or dislodging the basketball. The result for that is a player technical foul. That’s a technical foul on the offending player. Two free throws by any player or eligible substitute the ball at the division line, opposite the table. That’s where the resulting throw in would be. In addition to a player, technical, foul being assessed, there is also a delay of game warning that is assessed to the team. So it’s a double whammy. They get both the technical foul and the warning. If the defensive player reaches through the boundary plane and contacts, the thrower hits the thrower, holding the ball, slap them on the wrist. That is an intentional foul assessed to the defensive player. 

Support the Show!

Enjoy the Show? Consider Buying us a Cup!

In addition to the intentional foul, there’s also carries with it a delay of game warning for breaking the plane important to know that that always comes with either of those two situations. When we have an intentional foul, the penalty of which is the offended player or their eligible substitute, we’ll shoot two free throws and the ball will be taken out at the spot nearest the foul player or their substitute. If they were injured, say shoots two free throws. And then we come back to the original spot for the resulting throw-in. So reaches through contacts, the basketball player, technical, any player shoots two free throws ball at the division line, opposite the table. Plus the delay of game warning, same player reaches through the boundary plane contacts, the thrower, an intentional foul, two free throws for the offended player and the resulting throw-in his back at the spot. 

But of course, that also carries with it a delay of game warning. Alright, so now we have all of the restrictions on the defensive player. Great. Everything’s taken care of, but wait a minute, the thrower has no such restriction about the boundary plane. The thrower does not have to stay behind the boundary plane. They’re not allowed to step onto the court to carry the ball onto the court, but they are allowed to extend the basketball onto the court. They can break the plane and put the basketball over the basketball court. Let’s talk about when that happens. When that happens, when a pole, when the thrower extends the ball over the court, the restriction on the defensive player is they’re not allowed to penetrate the boundary plane, but when the thrower extends the ball, now that basketball is fair game and they can touch or dislodge the basketball by contacting it, or they can hold. 

They can grab the ball. So tightly that rough play may ensue and force a held ball. All of those scenarios can come into play. The restriction on the defender is they’re not allowed to cross the boundary plane and contact the ball. But if the ball comes to them, it’s fair game. Now let’s talk about the thrower extends the basketball over the court, the defensive player in an attempt to dislodge the ball contacts, the offensive player, the thrower on the wrist. Okay. The restriction for contacting the thrower does makes no mention of penetrating the boundary plane. So always contact on the thrower, whether they have the ball on this side or on that side of the boundary plane is always an intentional foul. Okay? So contact them the thrower, whether the ball is on this side or that side of the boundary plane is an intentional foul. 

The penalty for which is two free throws to the offended player and the ball will be inbounded at the spot nearest the foul. Now we’ve covered it. All of the restrictions on a defensive player during a throw-in.After a made basket, a team is allowed to inbound the basketball without the restriction of a designated spot. The thrower can be anywhere behind the end line. And the restriction about only one player being out of bounds is eliminated. So after a made basket, we can have two players, three players off the basketball court, you know, on the other side of the end line and have a throw-in occur. There is no restriction during a throw-in where the team can move, can run the end line. There is no restriction that the ball must be thrown onto the court. The thrower may throw the ball to a teammate who’s out of bounds. 

That is a legal play during this throw-in. Let’s look at let’s look at seven five seven. I throw-in anywhere along the end line, after a goal or an awarded goal for basket interference or goaltending. So a team puts up a shot it’s there’s basket interference. It’s the same as if the ball went in the basket, even though a violation has occurred, the goal is scored and the team has the freedom to move along the end line. the team not credited with the score must make a throw-in from the end of the court where the goal was made. And from any point outside the end line, and the officials must signal such right. They can move. If we were administering a throw-in, we would indicate that the players can move along the in line during this throw-in. Some of our restrictions for a designated spot throw-in do not apply during a throw-in where the team can run the end line. 

Let’s also address alternating-possession, throw-ins alternating-possession is a method of putting the ball in play after the initial jump ball or any jump ball for an extra period. NFHS uses alternating-possession to determine who will have the throw-in alternating-possession throw-ins and, and the arrow is switched when the throw-in ends. But if something occurs during the throw-in such as a foul or a violation by the defensive team, the arrow does not switch. So we just need to know about the fact that alternating-possession throw-ins exist and what we need to be aware of so that we don’t erroneously switch the arrow when they should not be during an alternating-possession throw-in. All right, that’s gonna wrap up our look at the remaining portions of throw-in restrictions, throw-in rules. Now let’s move on and look at some questions. 

Question: 

During an alternating-possession, throw-in by A1,  B2 intentionally contacts the ball with an extended leg. What is the result answers? 

A, the AP arrow should now point toward team B’s basket 

B the AP arrow should now point toward Team A is basket 

C the AP arrow should change toward team B’s basket prior to the throw-in, and then be changed toward Team A’s when the ball is kicked 

D none of the above. 

Referee the throw-in in high school basketball NFHS

Alright, so we have an alternating possession throw, and let’s say we had a held ball team, a has the arrow, A1 becomes the thrower and releases the throw-in pass. The defensive player extends a leg and illegally contacts. The ball, a kicking violation is ruled. If you look at rule six dash four, article five, the opportunity to make an alternating-possession throw is lost. If the team throw-in team violates, if either team fouls during an alternating-possession throw-in, it does not cause the throw-in team to lose the possession arrow. 

Support the Show!

Enjoy the Show? Consider Buying us a Cup!

If the defensive team commits a violation during the throw-in the possession arrow is not switched. So in this instance, our defensive team with a kicking violation, we do not switch the arrow and the resulting throw-in is not an alternating-possession throw-in anymore. The resulting throw-in is a throw-in for a kicking violation, the kind of violations that are most likely to occur during a throw-in by far a kicking violation. More, most likely also consider the punching the basketball violation that’s within the realm of possibility. So when the throw-in began the possession arrow pointed towards Team A’s basket. Team A has the ball for the throw-in. The ball is released and a whistle blows. Violation is ruled. The arrow should not be switched. It should still point to A’s basket. And the resulting throw-in is for the violation. So they answer the correct answer is: B the AP arrow should now point toward Team A’s basket. 

Question:

After Team A had previously been given a warning for delay, for breaking the throw-in plane during a Team B throw-in in the first half A1 reaches through the boundary on a Team B throw-in during the second half. What is the result? 

A player Technical Foul 

B team Technical Foul 

C player substitute technical, foul 

D an administrative Technical Foul. 

Referee the throw-in in high school basketball NFHS

Now, always when a Technical Foul is assessed, as it will be in this situation, it’s critical for the officials to know what kind of Technical Foul is it. Does it go to the player? Does it go to the team? Is it Administrative which can potentially have fewer consequences? We’ll talk about Administrative technical files. In another episode, remember that what our rule says, rule 10-2-1. Article C allow the game to develop into an actionless contest. This includes the following and similar acts C commit a violation of the throw-in boundary plane as in 9-2-10, after any team warning for delay in our case, play, the team warning for delay had been given. And this is the second. So the result is a team Technical Foul, two free throws for the offended Team And the ball of the division line opposite. The table. 

Question:

Team A is awarded a throw-in by the alternating-possession process. Before the throw-in is completed. B5 is ruled for a foul on A4. It is team B’s Fourth team foul and Team A is awarded a throw-in nearest the foul. Does the alternating-possession arrow change in favor of team B after the foul is committed?

Referee the throw-in in high school basketball NFHS

So Team A has the ball for throw-in before the throw-in ends, B5 is ruled for a foul on a four. So we have a defensive foul, possibly a hold freedom of movement foul as the player attempted to get open. It’s not a bonus free throws situation. Does the alternating-possession arrow change in favor of team B after the foul is committed? The answer is No. The fact that alternating-possession has not been used because the alternating-possession throw-in has not ended rule 6-4-5, if either team fouls during an alternating-possession throw-in, it does not cause the throw-in team to lose the possession arrow defensive team has fouled before the free-throw ended. The possession arrow will not change. The resulting throw-in will be for the foul and will not be an alternating-possession throw-in. So our answer to the question is the answer is a no, the possession arrow will not be changed. The arrow will still be in Team A’s favor.

Support the Show!

Enjoy the Show? Consider Buying us a Cup!

Question:

Team A is awarded a designated spot throw-in along the end line, A1 extends his or her arms over the end line, such that part of the forearms hands and ball are entirely on the inbound side of the boundary line B2 slaps, A1 on the wrist and dislodges the ball.

Answers:

A no foul. A boundary plane warning is given to team B 

B personal foul on B2, since the ball was inside the boundary line 

C stop play immediately and ask A1 to back up. So this doesn’t happen again, or 

D intentional foul. 

A1 is awarded two free throws and Team A will make the ensuing throw-in. So our thrower extends the ball, the defensive player, in an attempt to dislodge the ball contacts the wrist of the thrower and dislodges the ball. What is the ruling? contact on the thrower by a defender shall be ruled and intentional foul. The fact that the ball was on one side or another of the boundary plane has no bearing on this play. 

Never is the defender allowed to contact the thrower. Correct answer is not a personal foul on B2, but D and intentional foul. A1 is awarded two free throws and Team A will make the ensuing throw-in. And of course, that throw-in will be at the spot nearest the foul for an intentional foul. Important to remember that. So that’s going to wrap up this episode on throw-ins. We’ve covered it pretty much from a to Z between last episode and this, if you miss last week’s episode, you can always find a link to it right up here. The two episodes combined should give you a thorough understanding of national Federation of high school rules, covering throw-ins. That’s going to wrap it up for today’s episode of basketball rules, expert the show where we discuss the national Federation of high school basketball rules, bring them off the written page into an audio visual format for you. 

We have the usual request. It’s super helpful with the YouTube algorithm. If you could hit the like button, hit it with the same gusto you’d use when you whack that coach, you know that one! Also, hit subscribe and the notify a bell so that you don’t miss out on any of our content. As we approach the basketball season it is two times a week. If you want to support the show, you can always hit us up abetterofficial.com/coffee. The link is above and as always, we’ve created a quiz for you to take, see if the rules took. We have the questions that we asked in the episode. Plus we have some additional questions. You can get the quiz over at the website abetterofficial.com/expert04. We’ve got additional video content for you here, make your choice, choose wisely, and we’ll see you in the next video. Take care.

More to Explore

Basketball Rules Expert Podcast - Ep 012

Basketball Rules Expert Podcast – Ep. 12

Mistakes are made in the game of basketball. The rules offer us a way to handle the situations when they occur Become a Basketball Rules Expert and get it right

basketball rules expert podcast bench technical foul in nfhs basketball rules

Basketball Rules Expert Podcast – Ep. 11 – A Better Official

The end of the game is when we need to be our best. Teams have no opportunity to overcame any erroneous rulings at the end of the game. Today we look at 2 play scenarios that help us have a stronger understanding of NFHS basketball rules so we can get plays right!

Support the Show!

Enjoy the Show? Consider Buying us a Cup!

A Better Official Logo

Support the Show!

Enjoy the Podcast? Consider Buying us a Cup!